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Old 11-11-2008, 11:16 AM   #1
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Post ISO Rice cooking help

i'm starting to feel bad because of all my questions. truely, i am clueless about cooking.

anyone can lend me a hand in cooking rice ?

i tend to like the steamed rice i get at say a chinese restaurant a whole lot. mom has always made rice with garlic in it, and maybe some of the thin green onion, and while thats not so bad, i've been eating it all my life, and sometimes, a slightly over flavorful concentration of garlic, per rice, is not desireable for my tastes. any suggestions or instructions on making yummy white rice would be great, or elaborations, additions, or modifications based on what i've said.

p.s. i really have no clue on how to cook it myself in the first place.

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Old 11-11-2008, 11:56 AM   #2
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I've never steamed rice so can't comment there.

Cooking depends on the rice you use. I use parboiled long grain. I bring a pan full of water to the boil. At this point I often add a strock cube to put some flavour in the rice (you could just use stock. I add the rice (about 50g per person) and bring the liquor back up to the boil, stirring occasionally. I let it simmer for about 10 minutes and try a little - it should be soft with a little bite. I then drain the rice and serve.

This is one way - a quick easy way - there are lots of other ways which I am sure some of which will be posted.
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Old 11-11-2008, 11:59 AM   #3
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Oldramon, please do not feel bad about all your cooking questions.....ALL of us were in your shoes at one time, and there probably are many of us on this board who were NOT so fortunate to have the internet avalable to help us learn!! It was either from watching mom, grandma, or trial and error, and more error than not!!! So ask away as often as you need to and about whatever you need to!!!

About your rice, I have an Asian sister-in-law and she says the first thing is to NEVER rinse the rice, and that is the "secret" to the goodness of the rice you find in your oriental restaurants. Some say never do this, some say "yuck" if it is not rinsed. To each their own!!! (Personally, I give the rice one rinse -- fill up the pot it's going to cook in with water, swish the rice around with my hand, rubbing it a bit, dumping that water and then replacing with the amount of water to cook it.) I also add some salt, but never the butter that the package directions state. The SIL states to bring the rice and water to a full boil, lower the heat and once the boil stops, cover the pan with a proper fitting lid, and let it cook until done. No stirring, no peeking at it, until it has been cooking for the recommended time on the package, usually 15-20 minutes. Then look and taste test for doneness, and still NO stirring! If it needs more cooking, cover, and let it continue, checking it approx. every 5 minutes, and always with no stirring. That is the way I make a "regular white" rice -- long or short grain -- and it turns out perfect every time, thanks to the SIL's guidance!!!

Being Italian, we make a lot of risotto, which is a type/style of rice, from Italy. It comes under various names, arborio is one. It is a very short and stubby grain, and takes quite a while to cook, 22-35 minutes, depending on how you are making it. Basically, rather than filling the pot with the rice and the amount of water called for and boiling/steaming until done, risotto is cooked by placing the rice in your pan and adding a HOT liquid of your choice, usually a stock of some type -- chicken, vegetable -- by the ladle-full, adding enough of the hot stock just until the rice is once again covered with the liquid. It is stirred frequently throughout, never covered, and adding more hot liquid once the prior liquid has been cooked into the rice. You continue to do this until the rice is done to your desired tenderness. From there, you can leave it, or, you can add whatever you want to it -- a pat or two of butter and some freshly shaved parma-reggie, portabello mushrooms, veggies, diced meat/poultry, etc.

You can do an internet search for recipes and get some ideas for making risotto or any other rice, plain or with additions.
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Old 11-11-2008, 12:12 PM   #4
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Have you tried instant rice? I know a lot of people here don't care for it, but we like it fine when served with something that has a sauce or gravy. Uncle Ben's instant brown rice, which cooks in 10 minutes, is especially good, and better for you.
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Old 11-11-2008, 12:47 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QUEEN-GUINEVERE View Post
...
About your rice, I have an Asian sister-in-law and she says the first thing is to NEVER rinse the rice, and that is the "secret" to the goodness of the rice you find in your oriental restaurants. Some say never do this, some say "yuck" if it is not rinsed. ...

I think rinsing the rice is a personal preference but also depends on how you intend to use the rice. If you want "sticky" rice that kind of clumps together or you plan on using a heavy sauce then don't rinse it before cooking. However, if you are wanting individual grains not sticking to each other say for a stir fry then definitely rinse very well. This comes from 3 different Korean chefs I know.
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Old 11-11-2008, 12:56 PM   #6
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I think rinsing the rice is a personal preference . . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by queen-guinevere
.... Some say never do this, some say "yuck" if it is not rinsed. To each their own!!!

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Old 11-11-2008, 01:15 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by jabbur View Post
I think rinsing the rice is a personal preference but also depends on how you intend to use the rice. If you want "sticky" rice that kind of clumps together or you plan on using a heavy sauce then don't rinse it before cooking. However, if you are wanting individual grains not sticking to each other say for a stir fry then definitely rinse very well. This comes from 3 different Korean chefs I know.
Exactly! There are no absolutes in cooking...

I cheat and use a Zojirushi fuzzy logic rice cooker... Perfect rice every time...
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Old 11-11-2008, 01:20 PM   #8
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I go with regular long grain rice. I always go 1 part rice, 2 parts water. I bring the water to a boil and add 1tsp salt & 1tsp olive oil for every cup of rice I use. Once the water is at a boil I slowly add the rice (may boil over) and stir. Once the rice comes back to a boil I reduce the heat to simmer and set the kitchen timer to 17 minutes. Once the timer goes off I remove from heat and spoon it onto a large bowl (so not to keep it cooking) fluff with a fork. There may be a little water left in the rice but thats ok since it will continue to absorb the moisure for a few minutes after you pull it off the stove.
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Old 11-11-2008, 02:34 PM   #9
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anyone can lend me a hand in cooking rice ?
Lots of different kinds of rice, and even more ways to prepare it. One of the most foolproof ways (if you do not have a rice steamer) is to use the oven method. No watched pots, no simmering issues, just put it in and take it out...

Once you get the hang of it, do yourself a favor and experiment with the different varieties available. The different flavors can really be used to compliment the dishes you cook, and you will end up keeping 4-5 varieties on hand at all times... :)
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Old 11-11-2008, 02:47 PM   #10
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I have had a rice cooker since we were in Korea in 1963...never use it because the directions are written in Japanese...LOL
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