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Old 09-27-2006, 11:40 PM   #11
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
EatToDeath - what you saw/heard on that show could very well be true. A Japanese cookbook I recently purchased said that there are hundreds of different varieties of rice in Japan, many of which can only be differentiated by true rice connesieurs(definitely misspelled - lol).

But - if you're interested, you can find at least one variety at most supermarkets, & probably several at an Asian or international food market.
not too sure about there being 100's of different varieties. 3, 4 or 5 varieties are what you typically find in a supermarket here.

u.s. grown japanese rice (calrose) is much cheaper than rice in japan, so i wouldn't bother looking for rice imported from japan. domestic rice here will set you back about $20 - $30 for a 5 kilo (11 lbs.) bag.
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Old 10-24-2006, 08:30 PM   #12
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Hello! I'm a new member requesting some help.

I've been trying to cook Japanese rice lately and it doesn't stick together as much as I would like, or as much as other rice I've had does. I'm using Nishiki Brand Premium Quality Sushi Rice and the following instructions:

The ratio of water to rice is about 1.3 to 1. The height of the pot I'm using is about 9 cm and the diameter is about 17 cm.
1. Bring to a boil uncovered.
2. Simmer on lowest heat setting for 20 minutes covered.
3. Steam with heat off for 15 minutes.

How can I make the rice stick together better or how can I make the rice stick together the most?
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Old 10-24-2006, 09:18 PM   #13
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Join Date: Apr 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malik11
Hello! I'm a new member requesting some help.

I've been trying to cook Japanese rice lately and it doesn't stick together as much as I would like, or as much as other rice I've had does. I'm using Nishiki Brand Premium Quality Sushi Rice and the following instructions:

The ratio of water to rice is about 1.3 to 1. The height of the pot I'm using is about 9 cm and the diameter is about 17 cm.
1. Bring to a boil uncovered.
2. Simmer on lowest heat setting for 20 minutes covered.
3. Steam with heat off for 15 minutes.

How can I make the rice stick together better or how can I make the rice stick together the most?
are you washing the rice first? cover with cold water, stir it around by hand with your fingers spread, pour off the milky looking water, and repeat at least 3 or 4 times, until the water you pour off is mostly clear. the rice will be absorbing some water during this operation, so if you're not doing this, your overall water ratio will be slightly less than optimal.

try changing to a pot that is taller and has a smaller diameter.

other than that, try increasing the ratio of water slightly.

cooking rice in a pan is a lost art here in japan, but here's how it used to be done.
- after washing the rice, bring it to a boil on high heat.
- immediately reduce to a med-low heat, just enough to simmer. a low boil is important. if the temp. is too low, the rice won't steam properly. cover the pan.
- listen to the pan carefully. after the water has boiled off, the rice will continue to cook from the direct low heat, forming a crispy crust on the bottom. you'll be able to hear it crackle. turn off the heat and let it sit for a few minutes. this crust is known as "okoge" (oh-koe-gay) and people love it here. unfortunately, with a rice cooker, you can't do this.
- a heavy pan is best. cast iron is best. heavy stainless with a thick aluminum bottom is also ok. thin pans such as the so-called "copper-clad" paul revere pans lead to easy scorching.
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Old 10-24-2006, 11:02 PM   #14
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I always soak the rice in water for at least 2 hours before cooking. That's the technique I've read in several sushi cookbooks and it works very well for me.
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Old 10-25-2006, 06:35 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix
I always soak the rice in water for at least 2 hours before cooking. That's the technique I've read in several sushi cookbooks and it works very well for me.
Are you using an electric rice cooker, Chopstix?
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Old 10-28-2006, 09:07 PM   #16
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Okay, I have tried many things now including washing the rice, soaking the rice, using more water, and forming okoge in the pot, and cookbooks more or less acknowledge my former method of cooking the rice in the first place, with the exception of washing and soaking, but the rice will not stick together well. It did stick when I used an electric steamer, but the rice turned out almost like a paste. I have a strong suspicion that the rice is the problem. What do you fellows think?

According to the package the rice apparently uses a new milling technology so that no rinsing is required.
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