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Old 09-27-2006, 10:55 AM   #1
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Japanese rice

OK, I admit, I'm new to this forum and have not had to time to "relish" the multiple entries. In time, grasshoppers, in time. But I wonder, after having watched TONS of the Japanese (and American) Iron Chef episodes, if Japanese rice is actually available in the U.S. Supposedly, the rice is not offered here. But, is it? Have any of you had it? I can't imagine it's that much better than other rices. Is it????

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Old 09-27-2006, 11:31 AM   #2
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It is, I believe, called "Sushi rice".

It is a short grain type of rice, with lots of starch and it is sticky(thus suitable for forming nigiri sushi and rice balls) and has a vaguely sweet flavour which is pleasant.

It is offered by some online shopping sites, including amazon. If there is a food shop that specializes in ethnic foods, chances are you will be find it there.
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Old 09-27-2006, 01:23 PM   #3
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If it is sushi rice you are talking about most every grocery store around here carries right along with the other rices AND in the ethnic section.

I don't know for sure if that's what you are talking about though.
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Old 09-27-2006, 02:26 PM   #4
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I love Jasmine rice and it is sticky like sushi rice. I think Uncle Ben's has it's place but I prefer ethnic rices.
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Old 09-27-2006, 04:09 PM   #5
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I would suggest going to a supermarket and ask where they have the Japanese rice. I am sure that they carry it.
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Old 09-27-2006, 04:26 PM   #6
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check out this website and see if this is helpful, it gives some descriptions of different rice from around the world, including Japan

http://www.uwajimaya.com/glossary.as...pha=R+++++++++
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Old 09-27-2006, 04:46 PM   #7
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EatToDeath, I don't know where you live, but nearly all the big supermarket chains around here now carry a variety of rices, including the Japanese "sticky" type. Even CostCo carries it.

Check out your local supermarkets' Asian food aisles, as well as the rice aisle. And depending on where you live, any Asian market will certainly carry a variety of rices as well.

While other types of rice may very well make do for side dishes, well-made sushi definitely requires the proper rice.
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Old 09-27-2006, 08:26 PM   #8
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Well, I just remember watching an Iron Chef episode, and of course we know they have the best ingredients, and they mentioned that the type of rice they used that night was not sold outside of Japan. Maybe things have changed in the years since that episode. I guess all it takes is for a few plants or seeds to make it out of Japan, and then the product can be grown.
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Old 09-27-2006, 08:34 PM   #9
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For Japanese Rice, we use what's called Calrose Rice or California Rice. It's short-grained and sticky. Thai Jasmine rice is long-grained and in my experience, not sticky enough.
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Old 09-27-2006, 08:55 PM   #10
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EatToDeath - what you saw/heard on that show could very well be true. A Japanese cookbook I recently purchased said that there are hundreds of different varieties of rice in Japan, many of which can only be differentiated by true rice connesieurs(definitely misspelled - lol).

But - if you're interested, you can find at least one variety at most supermarkets, & probably several at an Asian or international food market.
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