"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-11-2004, 12:14 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 973
Lasagna

My mother accidently bought some Lasagna noodles by mistake and gave them to me because she doesn't use them. I'm a Stouffer's Lasagna hound and have never made it from scratch. Thus, I have a few questions. I note on the package back (Creamette's) that there are boil and no boil options. Is one better than the other? Also, I have parmesan and mozzarella cheeses (and many more), but no ricotta. Ricotta is not my favorite cheese, so can I sub it out (no, I don't like cottage cheese)? Or, if I don't use the noodles for Lasagna, is there another good use?

__________________

__________________
Otter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2004, 12:25 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,714
no boil is better, imho. you are just adding water and end up diluting the flavors of the ingredients you put in it if you boil the noodles first. the no boil lasagna method sucks the moisture and some flavor out of the surrounding ingredients and into the pasta, making it taste better...
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2004, 12:26 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Audeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 1,871
Try tofu as a substitute for ricotta or cottage cheese. It works perfectly and is darned healthy, too. I've used it myself often in fillings and such. Just use it as a direct substitution, cup for cup.

For the noodles, I always boil mine first, drain, then start the layering process. I recall that being absolutely necessary when using the dried, boxed stuff, otherwise, there were a multitude of hard, uncooked spots in the noodles.

Be sure to rub a wee bit of olive oil on your baking dish before putting the first layer down. It will make the serving process a lot easier in getting the stuff out of the dish.
__________________
Pain is inevitable. Suffering is Optional.
Audeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2004, 12:35 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 485
I boil them too. If you don't, my experience is that you have to make sure every millimeter of that noodle is covered with generous sauce, and still I don't like how mine gets sticky. You can boil them and instead of layering the lasgana dish, roll them up. I don't have the recipe here, I'll post a roll-up lasagna dish later or tomorrow.
__________________
debthecook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2004, 12:48 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,714
i've never used creamette, only lasagna noodles specifically made for no boil. i think they're a bit thinner. deb's right, the noodles need to be well covered in sauce. i'll have to try audeo's trick with a little olive oil down first, thanks...
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2004, 06:32 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
marmalady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
Also, don't boil the noodles as long as it says on the pkg - do more of an 'al dente' because they will continue to cook - and be sure to drain them well, so the sauce doesn't get watered down!

Re a sub for ricotta - you can make a thick bechemel (in fact, a lot of very 'traditional' Italian lasagna recipes call for this instead of the ricotta), and season it however you like - garlic, some parm mixed in, oregano, red pepper flakes, etc.

Mangia, Mangia!
__________________
marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2004, 07:42 PM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Re a sub for ricotta - you can make a thick bechemel (in fact, a lot of very 'traditional' Italian lasagna recipes call for this instead of the ricotta), and season it however you like - garlic, some parm mixed in, oregano, red pepper flakes, etc. Mangia, Mangia!
mmmm, like the sound of the Bechamel - thanks.
__________________
Otter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2004, 09:31 PM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Leaf Storm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 383
Yes, authentic lasagna should be layers of pasta with alternate sauces of bechemel and a mince beef/lamb tomato sauce...

NO cheese! :)
__________________
My photography, prose and poetry at Light of the moon :)
Leaf Storm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2004, 07:11 AM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Virginia
Posts: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaf Storm
Yes, authentic lasagna should be layers of pasta with alternate sauces of bechemel and a mince beef/lamb tomato sauce...

NO cheese! :)
Here's Emeril's Lasagna Bolognese, which appears to fit your description, Leaf. Except it includes a light dusting of Parmesan. It looks pretty fabulous.


Lasagna Bolognese

2 tablespoons butter
6 strips bacon, diced
1/4 pound ham, diced
1/2 pound ground veal or ground pork, or 1/4 pound of each
1 pound ground beef
1 1/2 cups chopped onion
1/2 cup finely chopped carrot
1/2 cup finely chopped celery
1/4 pound thinly sliced mushrooms
3 cloves garlic, minced
Pinch ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 cup dry white wine
3 cups chicken stock
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
4 chicken livers, finely chopped
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1 1/2 pounds fresh spinach pasta
Bechamel Sauce, recipe follows
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan

In a large pot heat the butter over medium high heat. Add the bacon and ham and saute until caramelized and light brown, about 10 minutes. Add the ground meats and cook over high heat until well-browned, stirring constantly, about 20 minutes.
Add the onions, carrots, celery, and mushrooms and cook until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, cloves and nutmeg to the pan and cook for 2 minutes. Add tomato paste and cook for 2 minutes. Add the wine and cook until almost evaporated.
Add stock and simmer over medium high heat until sauce is thickened and flavorful, about 45 minutes to 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
Add the chicken livers to the pot and cook 5 minutes. Stir in the cream and parsley, and adjust seasoning if necessary. Set aside until ready to assemble lasagna.
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
Butter a large rectangular baking dish, then spoon 1/2-cup of meat sauce onto the bottom of the dish. Cover with 1 sheet of fresh pasta. Top the lasagna with a layer of meat sauce (making certain that pasta is completely covered), a layer of bechamel, then a light dusting of cheese. Repeat layering lasagna, sauces, and cheese in this manner until all have been used, ending with a topping of bechamel and cheese.
Bake until the lasagna is bubbling and golden brown, about 1 hour. Allow to rest 10 minutes before serving.

Bechamel:
6 tablespoons butter
6 tablespoons flour
4 1/2 cups milk
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

In a saucepan, melt the butter over low heat and stir in the flour, stirring constantly until smooth, about 2 minutes. Slowly whisk the milk into the flour, stirring vigorously to blend together. Set over high heat and quickly bring to a boil for 1 minute, stirring. Allow to cook another 5 minutes, or until floury taste is gone. Remove from heat and add salt and nutmeg to taste.
__________________
Catseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2004, 07:36 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I've used both the no-boil and boil methids with my lasagna. I've had great results with both. But the boil method assures you of cooked noodles every time.

Instead of olive oil, I put just a bit of sauce on the bottom of my lasagna pan. They never stick that way either.

I use a highly spiced sauce, as the noodles have substantial flavor and will overpower the spices from my standard sauce. The spices I use are oregano, rosemary, sweet basil, and thyme. Add salt and pepper to taste. The veggies include onion, canned tomato (not diced. I cut them the size I want), black olives. I use a combination of Parmesan, mozzarella, and cottage cheese. The meat is normaly browned, drained, and rinsed ground beef, sometimes with Italian Sausage mixed in.

I know this recipe isn't traditional, if there is such a thing, but it sure tastes great and is the preffered recipe in my family, and extended family. I have some freinds in California who have made this with me. I and a good freind made seven pans of lasagna this way for a get together of young married couples when I was about twety one or so. The wives didn't have to cook or clean up at all. They were thrilled, and well fed. I still remember the fun and excitement, as in those days, it was the rare husband who could cook. :D

Anyways, choose the recipe that best suits you, 'cause you and your family/guests are the ones you must please.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vegetable Cheese Lasagna Filus59602 Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 2 06-12-2006 04:04 PM
Asparagus Lasagna kansasgirl Vegetables 2 11-06-2004 02:37 PM
Asparagus Lasagna kansasgirl Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 9 11-03-2004 07:07 PM
Vegetable Cheese Lasagna Filus59602 Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 0 11-03-2002 11:45 PM
Vegetable Cheese Lasagna Filus59602 International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery 0 11-03-2002 11:43 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.