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Old 04-14-2010, 05:12 AM   #11
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We usually have the blue box or velvetta shells & cheese. I made some homemade (but used spagetti, no elbows) and made it w/a roux blonde sauce or what ever it is called. Now I have elbow mac.

My questions:

Make the roux kind or the "custard" kind(w/egg)?

What is your fav recipe for mac & cheese?

Make'n this for a 14yr old son and 11yr old daughter, and wife(she is 18 joke)

We have the shredded cheese, I also have a small pie slice of brie(tried it and wasn't to crazy about it) and a mozz ball.

Just look'n for ideas and how you all do it.

Thanks

Another Mac-N-Cheese Thread????
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Old 04-14-2010, 06:15 AM   #12
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Another Mac-N-Cheese Thread????
Is that a bad thing??? Some of us haven't been around as long and it's a bonding moment...
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Old 04-14-2010, 06:35 AM   #13
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Another Mac-N-Cheese Thread????
I tried to search for it but came up w/nothing. I probably did something wrong, happens alot.

If you have a thread in mind, please show us noob's the way and we can read that.

But, to answer your question... Yes.
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Old 04-14-2010, 06:45 AM   #14
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Here's my basic Macaroni and Cheese recipe. For Béchamel-based sauces, just change the roux to milk ratio to adjust the thickness. Using straight cheddar can give a grainy sauce, so you might want to blend in other cheeses.
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Old 04-14-2010, 09:46 AM   #15
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I make mac and cheese that is fairly close to the blue box that my guys love. I cook the noodles (elbow, shells, penne, spirals doesn't matter) add butter and 8 oz cream cheese and 8-10 oz (about 1/3 of a box) of Velveeta (not the slices). Add some milk (I eyeball it probably around 3/4 cup to make it creamy. Sometimes I add sour cream, I always add shredded cheddar just at the end around 1-1/2 cups. I tend to add whatever cheeses I have around too so sometimes that means swiss, mozzarella, or monterey jack. This all happens in the pot the noodles are cooked in. I don't add any spices since everyone has their own tastes. One likes seasoned salt, one likes salt and pepper, one likes lemon pepper, so they add their own to their serving.
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Old 04-14-2010, 10:50 AM   #16
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Velveeta comes in slices??? Who knew?
When I want cheese, I want real cheese.
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Old 04-14-2010, 04:42 PM   #17
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Velveeta comes in slices??? Who knew?
When I want cheese, I want real cheese.
The velvetta is just for creamy factor....
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Old 04-14-2010, 06:47 PM   #18
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I think Velveeta makes a darn fine Mac & Cheese, & when it's on sale, I definitely make use of it. It's especially good with sauteed ground turkey & blanched chopped broccoli folded in, & everything topped with crumbs before the baking dish goes into the oven. Not "haute cuisine", but definitely GOOD.
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Old 04-14-2010, 09:41 PM   #19
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There is a secret that no one is sharing yet. If you want a silky smooth sauce, make your roux with equal parts butter and flour, cooking until it just starts turning blonde. Add the milk slowly, whisking it in until you have a sauce that will thickly coat a spoon. Season with salt and pepper, and just a bit of nutmeg. This next part is critical. For perfect cheese sauce, remove the pan from the heat and slowly fold in the shredded cheese of your choosing, be it Parmesano Regiano, or a full bodied aged cheddar. To much heat will cause the sauce to break, or in other words, the protiens in the milk and cheese will begin to lump together, giving you a grainy, or even lumpy sauce. The sauce really shouldn't be any hotter than 180' or so. the liquid boils at somewhere around 212.

Breezy's method will give you a great cheese custard style mac & cheese casserole that is to die for. It will be rich, and firm, and very tasty. But if you are looking for a creamy texture, make the sauce as I have outlined, and fold into the cooked pasta. This sauce is named differently, depending on the cheese used in the sauce. Look up Bechemel and its derivative sauces to get an idea of how many ways you can use this most popular of mother sauces. It's used in everything from Welsh Rarebit, to creamed meats or creamed veggies, to sausage gravy, to soups, stews, & chowders. But to successfully use it with cheese, keep the temperature moderately low.

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Old 04-15-2010, 01:49 AM   #20
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Is that a bad thing??? Some of us haven't been around as long and it's a bonding moment...
Ok
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