"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-22-2017, 08:46 AM   #1
Head Chef
 
letscook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Finger Lakes of NY
Posts: 1,972
Making Fresh Pasta Dough

I have never made fresh pasta dough, perogie dough yes.
Doing some research on it and watching some videos has made me more confused,

Some call for 1 cup flour to one egg, then another 2/3 cup flour to one egg, and one says make a pile of flour with a well add 3 eggs and keep stirring in flour till comes together if any remaining flour use for dusting.

Figure I would come here and get it straighten out.
I find it amazing watching the elderly pros making this. Nothing like watching Grama cook. I didn't have anyone growing up that made fresh pasta.

Learn to make perogies from my mother in law 38 yrs ago but no fresh pasta.

Any information will be most appreciated and Thank you all

__________________

__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching
letscook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2017, 09:04 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 2,938
You actually just have to try them all to see which one you prefer.

Some are more like egg noodle type pasta. and there are some with no egg at all. I use a recipe with 3 eggs, 2 c flour, Olive Oil.
I divide my dough up into serving portions and freeze.

If making for myself and/or grandkids I get 6 portions. But for adult guests I divide into 4.
__________________

__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2017, 09:37 AM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 44,454
Different proportions will make dough. I go with 1 cup of flour and one egg. knead thoroughly, wrap and rest for 30 minutes. Then make your pasta.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2017, 01:09 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 3,706
I think I use about 3/4 cup flour to 1 egg, but I'll have to double check. I actually make mine in the food processor. Mix the flour with any added ingredients (like spinach), then with machine running, drop in eggs 1 at a time, and maybe a few drops of water if it looks dry until it's starting to form a ball. I then give it a few kneads on a floured board, press into a disk, wrap with plastic wrap and let it rest for least 30 minutes. If I'm making it several hours ahead, I'll refrigerate it, then take it out and let it warm up a bit.
medtran49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2017, 01:58 PM   #5
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 744
My pasta recipes are as follows:

Per shelled raw eggs, double the weight of plain flour and durum wheat flour together, meaning that if you use three eggs, you break them open, weigh them, and then calculate the weight of flour you're going to need. Work the dough with damp hands until you get a smooth and velvety ball of dough. Different flours need different times, but that's the result you should be looking for. Then rest it for a while, the more you rest it, the more workable it is when you come to roll it out, it's more manageable and won't stick.

The old technique of making a mountain of flour and then making a crater in the middle where you put the eggs is also crucial in hand made egg pasta, which you use for lasagne and ribbon pasta, or tagliatelle.

This may seem vague, but - go on! go ahead jump and see!

Now we come to water and flour pasta, which is much more widely used in Southern Italy.

The proportions are: 1kg durum wheat flour and 50 % max tepid water, plus salt. The basic technique is the same as egg pasta - make the crater with the flour, and put the water and salt in the crater, easing the flour into the mix as you go. It should make a somewhat firmer dough, but you can shape it very well once it has rested in the fridge for an hour. You can make short pasta like 'strascinati', or pulled pasta shapes, by rolling a 'rope' of pasta, which you then shape by putting three fingers into the top of the sausage, and then pulling the pasta towards you without tearing it. cut into the desired lengths, leave to rest and dry out a little before cooking

Hope this answers some of your questions and uncertainties.

By the way, Sofia Loren famously said ''making pasta made me the woman I am'' ! You can make what you like out of that remark!

All the best

di reston



Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2017, 02:25 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 2,938
I didn't really give quantities, so here is my version. Like Medtran I also use the fp. So fast and done ta da!!! If I feel the need to work with dough - I make bread!

2 cups flour, 3 eggs, 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt.
Process all in fp til starting to come together.
Dump out the mass and grabbing walnut size pieces of dough, feed back in thru the tube.
If necessary add 1 or 2 tablespoons of warm water. (I find I need to add about 1 Tablespoon).
Work into large ball, cover and rest 30 minutes.
Divide into 2 pieces if going directly to rolling them out.
or Divide into 4 pieces (1 adult serving each) wrap in plastic-wrap, fridge or freeze.
or divide into 6 pieces (smaller servings) wrap in plastic, fridge or freeze.

It doesn't take very long at all to defrost. Perfect for last minute thoughts!

and the Pasta Roller is a favourite with the grandkids! "Look Dad Look! I'm a cook, I'm a cook!"
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2017, 02:27 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 2,938
di? isn't there a sort of formula... 3 eggs for 3 servings? 2 eggs for 2?
is that how you figure out how much you need for a certain number of guests?
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2017, 05:01 PM   #8
Head Chef
 
letscook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Finger Lakes of NY
Posts: 1,972
Thanks everyone for your help. I will be taking on this challenge soon.
__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching
letscook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2017, 10:07 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
larry_stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,784
What ever recipe you decide to go with, my suggestion ( if your using one of those hand cranked pasta machines).

My personal experience , is that when the dough was chilled, and floured, it ran through the pasta machine much better, and didnt stick.

Also, lightly flour the pasta after it goes through the machine to keep the individual strands separate ( from not sticking to each other and becoming a clump).

I haven't done it in 6 + months, and only do it 2 or 3 times a year, so I'm just basing this info on my limited memory. Others may have other tips or suggestions.

I never knowingly used the same dough recipe twice. I do it so infrequently, that when Im ready to go, i just do a search or thumb through a cookbook. Often, due to the variation of the size of the eggs ( I have chickens, so my egg sizes vary all the time), I have to play around with the flour ratio to get the desired consistency that passes through the machine.
larry_stewart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2017, 05:58 AM   #10
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 2,060
Disclaimer: I've never made pasta by hand, only with pasta machines.

My latest is a Philips, which comes with measuring cups for flour and water or water / egg. Being a fully automatic extrusion machine, there isn't an option to adjust the ingredients while kneading, and it's pretty sensitive to the flour liquid ratio. In their efforts to make it as moron proof as possible, the measuring cup has lines for water alone and water / egg mix. The instructions call for adding a bit of water to the eggs to bring it up to the proper volume of liquid, as eggs vary in size. The required volume of egg / water is about 5% higher than for plain water. There is a measuring cup for flour, but the recommendation is to weigh the flour, rather than using volume.

My previous machine wasn't fully automatic, and a little judgment was required. I learned that it was best to start kneading a little on the dry side, then add water as required. It didn't take much water to change the consistency, and I would add a tablespoon or two at a time.

If I was to make pasta dough by hand or in a mixer, I would pick up a finely graduated measuring cup (metric), weigh the flour, and record the proper amounts for future reference.

Hope this helps.
__________________

tenspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dough, pasta

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.