"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-03-2006, 01:31 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
thanks for all the follow ups.... i will include some other background info... i work in a small italian restaurant in central america where we make pasta from scratch daily. when deciding on a pasta recipe, i chose mario batalis basic pasta recipe which calls for 3 1/2 cups fllour and 5 whole eggs which was the one i was using. the restaurant where i work is also a bed & breakfast and i was fortunate to have chef angelo troiani from "il convivio troaiani" (http://www.ilconviviotroiani.com/eng/home.htm - a michelin rated restaurant in rome) stay with us for a week. i had the privilege of sharing my kitchen with him a couple of days and i was trying to extract as much info as i could from him and when we touched on the topic of pasta, he was the one who suggested the use of pasta using just the yolks, said he uses this at his restaurant... he didnt give me a recipe but he said roughly that for every one egg, use two yolks - when i tried it it didnt quite work out but i realize that perhaps the eggs he uses in italy are not JUMBO and im guessing the eggs i use have a higher proportion of albumen than yolk per egg.... in the end, i end up using around 12 yolks for the recipe above, but then i started analyzing that maybe the whole metric vs imperial systems in measuring the flour by volume (cups) rather than weight (grams) was throwing it off....ummm, well, i end up adjusting it as needed by feeling it out
__________________

__________________
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 12:52 AM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 3
i used to be a sous chef at a fine dining Italian restaurant, so my chef turns to me and says, "you know how to make ravioli right?" we compared pasta recipes, his was in a standing mixer with just egg yolks and i did mine by hand with whole eggs. after time had sunk in and him trying to pass his dough through the machine, he turned to me and said, ok, you got this now, and threw half of his dried up dough in the trash. mine, had stood up just as long and i didnt have to throw half my pasta away and i was able to complete the task. so what i learned today was that using whole eggs creates more moisture, longevity, and overall elasticity. his dough, of corse, made a richer dough, but drier in the end. unless you are trying to make "egg pasta," use whole eggs, you'll come out with a better yield and more cost effective. mind you he used around a dozen egg yolks: 2 cups flour, and i used 3 cups flour to 4 whole eggs. the dough wasnt sticky, i sprinkled flour on the machine but thats all it needed.
__________________

__________________
chefany87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 12:17 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
I've always used whole eggs when I make egg pasta, but I've also seen people using egg whites along, the egg whites subing for water. Whites are, o course, 90% water, but the proteins in the albumen must have some effect. I'll have to try them now. Somehow, it feels like it would be a "slicker" dough.
__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 12:35 PM   #14
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,398
I always make eggless dough so I have no idea what agg or youlk would do to my pasta. But wow, this is one old thread. How did you even dog this out Any? Thanks.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.