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Old 01-26-2012, 10:10 AM   #1
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My brown rice just isn't right.

Every time I make brown rice it seems to never cook completely but burn on the bottom.I know brown rice is suppose so have a different texture than white rice,but I can't seem to get it right. What's the right way to cook brown rice?

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Old 01-26-2012, 10:19 AM   #2
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I got a rice steamer and it's perfect every time.
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:18 AM   #3
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I have been cooking brown rice this way for 40 years.

Measure out some dry brown rice.
Put it in a sieve and rinse it very well.
Put it in a heavy pot. I use enamelled cast iron.
Add twice as much water as rice.
Add ~ 1/4 tsp salt.

Bring the rice to a boil.
Don't stir the rice.
Boil for 5-10 minutes.
Don't stir the rice.
Turn the heat down.
Don't stir the rice.
Put the lid on.
Simmer for ~50 minutes. (~35-40 min, if it is brown basmati)
Don't stir the rice.

To check if the rice is done, poke a wooden spoon straight down and then lean it a little bit, so you can see all the way to the bottom. Pull out a few grains of rice and taste them. I seldom bother to taste the rice any more because I am so familiar with how it looks when it's done.
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:21 AM   #4
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Taxlady gives some good advice, however, I think the most important thing is this:

"Turn the heat down."

If you're rice is burning on the bottom, you are cooking it at more than a simmer. I cook rice at the lowest setting on the burner. Leave the lid on and don't stir.
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:46 AM   #5
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Taxlady gives some good advice...
Mostly Water's advice is better. A rice cooker is the best way to make any kind of rice, and a good one will also steam vegetalbes, act as a slow cooker and the Krups rice cooker I have makes oatmeal, too!

If the rice cooker comes with a steamer basket that sits on top of the rice bucket, you can cook your rice and steam your vegetables at the same time!
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:49 AM   #6
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Mostly Water's advice is better. A rice cooker is the best way to make any kind of rice, and a good one will also steam vegetalbes, act as a slow cooker and the Krups rice cooker I have makes oatmeal, too!
Sorry, I don't see spending money on a gadget to be better advice. I've been making rice (and vegetables) just fine for about 40 years now without a rice cooker.

It's good to understand the basics of driving before buying a sports car.
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Old 01-26-2012, 12:03 PM   #7
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Sorry, I don't see spending money on a gadget to be better advice. I've been making rice (and vegetables) just fine for about 40 years now without a rice cooker.
And I can pull nails out with my teeth, but I prefer to use a claw hammer.

The rice cooker is a multi-purpose cooking tool, and most professionals use them, including Martin Yan and Ming Tsai. 60 bucks American is a small price to pay for perfectly cooked rice, vegetables, stews, and oatmeal for the next ten years.
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Old 01-26-2012, 12:15 PM   #8
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And I can pull nails out with my teeth, but I prefer to use a claw hammer.

The rice cooker is a multi-purpose cooking tool, and most professionals use them, including Martin Yan and Ming Tsai. 60 bucks American is a small price to pay for perfectly cooked rice, vegetables, stews, and oatmeal for the next ten years.
Holy cow. Sounds to me like you just enjoy being argumentative. But whatever. As the saying goes, there's more than one way to skin a cat.

If you want to shell out 60 bucks on an appliance, it's your money. But I also think it's important to understand cooking basics. I'd be willing to bet both Martin Yan amd Ming Tsai learned to cook rice in a pot before buying an appliance.
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Old 01-26-2012, 12:18 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Taxlady gives some good advice, however, I think the most important thing is this:

"Turn the heat down."

If you're rice is burning on the bottom, you are cooking it at more than a simmer. I cook rice at the lowest setting on the burner. Leave the lid on and don't stir.
And if you have gas, you may have to further reduce the heat. For my gas range (GE Profile running propane), even on the "simmer" burner, I have to use a heat diffuser to get it down to a proper low level.
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Old 01-26-2012, 12:20 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by lovelycook234 View Post
Every time I make brown rice it seems to never cook completely but burn on the bottom.I know brown rice is suppose so have a different texture than white rice,but I can't seem to get it right. What's the right way to cook brown rice?
I'll tell you how I make my brown rice and perhaps it will work for you. I guess there's many ways to succeed since mine isn't exactly like any of the above.

Put one measure of brown rice and two measures of water in a small sauce pan. Choose a pan that has a reasonably tight fitting lid, and the size should be such that the rice and water come up about half way.

Bring the rice to a boil, then quickly reduce the heat to the lowest setting and tightly cover. Do not take the cover off at any time. Do not peek. Do not stir it. Continue cooking for about 35-40 minutes then turn off the heat. At this point I usually give the rice a quick stir and put the cover back on until it's time to serve.

You should understand that it's the steam that cooks the rice not the water. Every time you remove the cover you're letting the important steam escape and reducing the amount of water left to produce steam. Do this too many times and most or all of the water will be gone and the bottom will burn. Use too big a pan or pot and your steam will be spread out and wasted on not cooking rice. If the lid doesn't fit tightly enough the steam will escape with the same end result, water gone and bottom burned.

The same method works for me with white rice. The only difference is that white rice takes 20 minutes and brown rice takes 40 minutes.

I recommend everybody should try Lundberg's "Jubilee" brown rice mixture, available at Whole Foods Market and other stores and online. It's my favorite brown rice.


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And if you have gas, you may have to further reduce the heat. For my gas range (GE Profile running propane), even on the "simmer" burner, I have to use a heat diffuser to get it down to a proper low level.
Yeah that's a good idea. I've sometimes felt that my natural gas stove burner even on the lowest setting was dangerously too high. To cook rice properly IMO you really need the very lowest flame possible, just the smallest amount of heat, just barely enough to produce a small amount of steam, no more than that.
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