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Old 11-20-2008, 06:52 PM   #1
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My first egg noodles

I had the day free so I decided to make my own noodles to go with the beef stew we were having for dinner. I researched a bunch of recipes then put together what I thought would make good noodles (isn't that what creativity is about?). I was pleasantly surprised that I nailed it the first time. Here's my recipe, which I'm sure may have already been dreamed up, but I'm too lazy to read that far back in the archives.

Flat Egg Noodles with Basil
Makes 6 oz of noodles ~ enough for 3-4 people

1 C All purpose flour
1 Egg
1 t Salt
1 T Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 t Basil (Oregano should also work well)
2 T Water (as needed)

Blend flour, salt and basil in a bowl. Break the egg in a separate dish to avoid any shell fragments. Make a depression in the flour mix and pour in the egg and olive oil. With a fork mix the egg and oil and slowly draw in flour to the center until you cannot blend with the fork. Continue blending in the flour using your fingers, adding water as needed, 1 T at a time. Dough should be firm and not sticky. If sticky, add a bit more flour until dough is smooth and slightly dry to the touch. Roll finished dough into a log and cut into three pieces to be rolled out.



If using a pasta machine, follow machine directions for making noodles, using one section of dough log at a time. Finished dough should be rolled on lowest setting. Be sure to allow rolled out dough to dry a bit before feeding into noodle rollers. Never put sticky dough through the machine rollers.

If using a rolling pin, roll dough to 1/16” thick or a little thinner, turning the dough from front to back several times on a floured surface. Allow to dry for 10 minutes (you can lightly flour the dough to speed up drying if it’s tacky). Roll up the dough into a log like a jellyroll, and cut the log into ” wide segments using a very sharp knife on a cutting board (to save the edge on your knife). Unroll segments and allow to dry on a pasta drying rack or on a flour dusted linen towel for about hour. (This is my homemade dryer)





Coil up pasta into loose piles and put in freezer in an air-tight container, or cook in salted water or stock about 15 minutes to use immediately.

Here was dinner, and there was nothing left when me and DW got finished with it (We were piggies tonight). The noodles were just like store-bought in texture, and held together nicely.



JoeV

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Old 11-20-2008, 06:54 PM   #2
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Awe Joe... that is great and looks de-lich!!!!! Man!!!! Some mighty fine cooks out here!
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:36 PM   #3
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Looks great, Joe. I've been making our noodles for years. Just wait until you make your own spinach pasta, or tomato, or mushroom, or....

Once you get started, like bread-baking, it's an addiction. Hey, it involves flour, doesn't it?

ETA
Buck made me a wonderful pasta drying rack that held several pounds of noodles in a space about the size of a small open umbrella. It all came apart when I was done using it and it fit in a space about the size of a yard stick and not very wide.
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Old 11-20-2008, 07:54 PM   #4
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I've seen a couple designs for drying racks that are collapsable. Once work slows down after Thanksgiving I'll have time to get back into my workshop and start playing again.
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Old 11-20-2008, 08:00 PM   #5
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Buck's was quite simple. He began with a large dowel (about 1 inch), cut it to about 30 inches long and cut a slit in one end so it could fit snugly into a 6x6 block of wood with a 1-inch hole drilled in it. Follow me so far?

The big dowel was then drilled with alternating 1/4-inch holes along the shaft from the opposite end. "Wings" of 1/4-inch dowels (about 36 inches long) were then slid through the drilled holes. The wings held the pasta for drying.

It all comes apart for storage.
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Old 11-20-2008, 08:50 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
Buck's was quite simple. He began with a large dowel (about 1 inch), cut it to about 30 inches long and cut a slit in one end so it could fit snugly into a 6x6 block of wood with a 1-inch hole drilled in it. Follow me so far?

The big dowel was then drilled with alternating 1/4-inch holes along the shaft from the opposite end. "Wings" of 1/4-inch dowels (about 36 inches long) were then slid through the drilled holes. The wings held the pasta for drying.

It all comes apart for storage.
Got it! I was engineer for 12 years, so I can visualize exactly what you have described. That was a great idea to make it collapsible, and I'll probably use Buck's design when I get time to make it. Thanks a lot!

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Old 11-20-2008, 08:53 PM   #7
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Go for it, Joe. I love my drying rack. Buck made it for me many years ago and it's dried many pounds of pasta.
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Old 11-20-2008, 10:41 PM   #8
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I make hillbilly noodles, that we call chicken and rolled dumplings. I need to post my recipe, but not tonight.
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Old 11-20-2008, 11:21 PM   #9
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Mmm - they look great!
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Old 11-20-2008, 11:50 PM   #10
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Joe, your noodles look delicious. You have inspired me to try making some. My mother always made her own noodles, and the store bought ones are just never as good. Besides, I cannot find egg noodles here. Pasta in every configuration you can imagine, but no flat egg noodles. Thanks for the tip, Katie - that sounds like a good project for Jerry. (And more sanitary - my mom always dried them over the backs of the dining room chairs!)
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