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Old 01-03-2009, 10:27 PM   #1
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New to making fresh pasta

I just got an attachement for my kitchenaid stand mixer for making pasta. I was curious if anyone had any tips or advice before I tackle making it for the first time.

Thanks!

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Old 01-04-2009, 01:29 PM   #2
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here's a receipe I used the first time I made fresh pasta that you might like to try. It makes a small batch and was easy to work with.

This receipe comes from Bob's Red Mill brand Semolina flour (it was on the back of the bag)

Well I can't post a URL yet so go to bob's red mill brand website and search for "Basic Pasta Recipe" I saw they have alot of other receipes on there also.

I made sure the eggs were room temperature before making this one, I'm guessing that helped but it was really simple and easy to do.

I had gotten a pasta maker for Christmas and originally made a batch of dough from all-purpose flour to clean the oil off the machine rollers and it was really difficult to work with.

This receipe is a bit wet(makes it easier to knead I think), so make sure you dust your pasta with flour each time you run it through the pasta maker. If you don't have a drying rack to dry your pasta strands, I used an oven rack and just draped the noodles over it to dry.

good luck, I'm sure there are more folks on here who can give better advice, I'm a neophyte pasta maker myself :)
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Old 01-04-2009, 01:41 PM   #3
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Here ya go:
Bob's Red Mill
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Old 01-04-2009, 01:54 PM   #4
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Thanks Susan! :)
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Old 01-04-2009, 05:02 PM   #5
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Thanks so much...I'll let you know it goes!
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Old 01-04-2009, 05:12 PM   #6
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which attachment ... the shapes or the rollers? I have former and want the latter. Mario Batali uses it all the time and makes it look so darned easy! It's on my wish list, but behind a couple other pricey items.

Please post feedback (I have no good tips to offer on the pasta itself). It's a matter of how the dough feels for me.
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Old 01-04-2009, 05:22 PM   #7
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I have the shapes...not the rollers.
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Old 01-04-2009, 05:31 PM   #8
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Just be aware that the recipe above for Bob's Red Mill is for "Semolina" flour, which is not interchangeable with all-purpose or italian "tipo 00" (doppio zero) flour.
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Old 01-04-2009, 05:43 PM   #9
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Yes, I'm glad you pointed that out. I'm using all purpose tonight but I will get the Semolina four tomorrow.

What is the difference?....besides the obivious...lol.
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Old 01-04-2009, 06:10 PM   #10
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Well, they are very different and for numerous reasons, but too many for me to go into detail. AP flour is made from soft-wheat and semolina or durum from hard wheat. In Italy, the classic fresh pasta made in Bologna is made with soft wheat flour and is generally the most commonly used at home. Semolina/durum has higher gluten and is harder to work with in home applications. It is the flour used most commonly for commercially extruded shapes. I prefer to use all-purpose, unbleached. It will be interesting for you to work with both and see which one you prefer and post back results.

Now... I can point out that almost every italian chef will tell you that in making BASIC fresh pasta with AP flour, nothing else goes in the dough other than flour and eggs (chopped spinach for green/squid ink for black in colored pasta). In semolina dough, often just water and semolina. Salt should be used in the cooking/boiling water, oil makes it slicker and is undesirable and nontraditional. I can point you to Ada Boni, Marcella Hazan, Giuliano Bugialli and Mario Batali as good sources of reference.

I have used Mario Batali's recipe to great success at a restaurant:

3 1/2 cups all-purpose, unbleached flour, plus extra for kneading
5 large eggs

Use the well method. Knead, knead, knead, knead some more... 10-15 minutes (you can use your own method if you are not kneading by hand.) Wrap dough in plastic wrap and rest for at least 10 mins before proceeding.

(NOTE: the absorption capacity of the eggs and humidity in the kitchen or lack thereof may cause slight variation in the amount of flour needed)

Buon appetito e buona fortuna!
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