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Old 12-25-2012, 06:21 PM   #1
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Noodle types, Oriental

I am hopeing Powerplant or any others might teach me about Noodles, oriental..

When I eat Oriental, I love the noodles..

Lomein, or Vietnamese Vermichelli dishes..

I have a nice Oriental grocery near me, but the Noodle Isle is like two blocks long!

They have rice noodles, what I would call White thin Vermichelli, also brown noodles..

They also have noodles in the refridge section!

I don't know which to buy?

and now Powerplant comes with Soba Noodles..

I don't even know which Isle they are on..

but if they are close to the Kimchee, I will be happy!

Eric, Austin Tx.

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Old 12-25-2012, 06:52 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
I am hopeing Powerplant or any others might teach me about Noodles, oriental..

When I eat Oriental, I love the noodles..

Lomein, or Vietnamese Vermichelli dishes..

I have a nice Oriental grocery near me, but the Noodle Isle is like two blocks long!

They have rice noodles, what I would call White thin Vermichelli, also brown noodles..

They also have noodles in the refridge section!

I don't know which to buy?

and now Powerplant comes with Soba Noodles..

I don't even know which Isle they are on..

but if they are close to the Kimchee, I will be happy!

Eric, Austin Tx.
For some good info: Chinese noodles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Japanese noodles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Korean noodles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Vietnamese noodles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Pancit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


For a quick down and dirty,
For lomein I love using the fresh egg noodles. If I can not get them I buy the dried ones.

Rice noodles sometimes are called rice sticks.
The Vermichelli can also be made from mung bean.

Soba noddles usually are in the Japanesse section dried. I usually buy the Japanesse brands. Look for a high buck wheat content. They are mainly about texture. Normally served cold.
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Old 12-27-2012, 04:01 PM   #3
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Zaru-soba. Cold buck wheat noodles are da bomb during the summer. My favorite, paired with tempura (Ten-zaru).
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Old 12-27-2012, 05:02 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Zaru-soba. Cold buck wheat noodles are da bomb during the summer. My favorite, paired with tempura (Ten-zaru).
Do they have soy or something else on them? The soba noodles that I am used to are more grey with black speckles (like buckwheat flour).
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Old 12-27-2012, 05:34 PM   #5
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Do they have soy or something else on them? The soba noodles that I am used to are more grey with black speckles (like buckwheat flour).
I don't think the color on those noodles are quite right. As you say, they should be greyish looking.
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Old 12-27-2012, 06:47 PM   #6
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They look like soba noodles to me.

There are a wide variety of them.
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Old 12-27-2012, 08:01 PM   #7
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But of course, I've had green ones too.
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:07 AM   #8
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Here at Casa de Hoot, we like lo mein very much.
My personal preference is udon noodles. Nice thick noodles that have very little flavor of their own but absorb flavors fairly readily and provide a nice "chew".
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Old 12-28-2012, 05:17 PM   #9
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But what about a nice soft noodle fishing pole? I love it when the rod is so flexible, and giving. They are hard to find anymore, at least in the stores around here.

Oh, wait, we're talking about edible, Asian noodles. Yeh, I knew that. But how many of you knew about noodle fishing poles?

Just as in Italian cooking, the Asian noodle to use is the best one for the recipe. This site - A Look at a Variety of Asian Noodles - Yahoo! Voices - voices.yahoo.com - gives a far better description than I could.

An interesting tip about cellophane (glass or mung bean noodles) noodles: if you drop the dried, uncooked noodle into a pot of hot oil, they will puff dramatically, and create a wonderfully light, and crispy noodle that is a perfect accompaniment for stir fries.

In any case, take a look at various Asian recipes and pay attention to what kind of noodles they're using. And don't forget that won ton, egg roll, and lumpia skins are noodles as well, and can be both fried, or boiled.

Chines pot stickers are a noodle dough wrapped around a filling, like ravioli.

And just as in Italian cooking, there are a thousand things that can be done with Asian noodles.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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