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Old 07-14-2006, 10:02 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
lo2? what dat??
lo2 is the original poster
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Old 07-14-2006, 10:10 AM   #12
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What a dumbbell I am!!!!!
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Old 07-14-2006, 11:13 AM   #13
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Yes I am from Denmark.

Denmark is a small country in Europe, it is has got a border to Germany, and it is part of Scandinavia, it is capitol is called Copenhagen.

For more information see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denmark
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Old 07-14-2006, 11:18 AM   #14
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Urmaniac has answered in a nearly complete way. I can only add that the hardness of pasta often depends from hom much "tender" or "hard" grain (correct?) has been used in its preparation. I kow by sure that, till sixties, there were two different productions for italian pasta: one for internal use, and another one for abroad, depending from fact that abroad, people seemed to prefer a softer type. And this type was produced mainly with tender grain flour. Actually, I think it's no more so. In every way, please observe stricltly the times indicated on the box: if Grain is "tender", it happens that after 8 minutes pasta is too hard. After 8 minutes and 30 seconds is too soft. On the box you must find tha words "pasta di grano duro". A liter for every 100 grams is affectively too much, but, in everyway, abundant. And, PLEASE, do-not-rinse! .
There is another type of pasta, not yet described : dried egg pasta. This is more quick to cook, than normal pasta, but not so quick than fresh pasta. Be careful. It absorbes sauces very quicly, and it deserves a bigger quantity of them.
The last. a)Bolognese sauce. It's a simple (?) ragout. The minced meat is cooked fo several hours in sedan, carrots and onions, whit flavours and white wine. At the last, you can, if you like, add some tomatoes, but very little.
b)Tirami-su (letterarly: "get me up") is a cake, normal cake, made with a particular type of biscuits, drawned in coffe, brandy, and mascarpone cream, covered with powder of chocolate. It had so a great diffusion that many ice creams companies made an iced version, industrial.
Good appetite.
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Old 07-14-2006, 11:36 AM   #15
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"hard grain" means "semola di grano duro"? If I am not mistaken it is known as "durum semolina" in English speaking world, and many pasta sold there like to advertise "they are made with durum semolina". I didn't know the pasta producers made two different versions one for domestic use and one for export, but after tasting the difference, yes... it makes sense, even ones from Barilla.

I also noticed the difference in the recipe of original Bolognese sauce, they use much, much less tomatoes than that is regularly known abroad. I must say however (Cristiano agrees with me too) I prefer more tomatoes and other vegetables and less meat in my sauce... but I think it is a matter of personal preference... there are countless variation as to how to make a "Bolognese sauce" even in Italy.

BTW, we do make our homemade (artigianale) Tiramisu ice cream, with mascarpone, fresh eggs, freshly brewed coffee and marsala wine!! It beats the heck out of any industrially made versions
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Old 07-14-2006, 11:41 AM   #16
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Yes, "semola di grano duro" is correct, thanks for translation.....
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Old 07-14-2006, 01:36 PM   #17
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lo2

I have been to your beautiful country and taken the boat to Malmo, where my family is originally from.

Sorry that I didn't notice that you are lucky enough to be from there!
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Old 07-15-2006, 04:41 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
lo2

I have been to your beautiful country and taken the boat to Malmo, where my family is originally from.

Sorry that I didn't notice that you are lucky enough to be from there!
Ok then you know it :)

What is the last sentence supposed to mean? And where are you from?
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Old 07-15-2006, 12:48 PM   #19
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Jennyemma, I, too like Barilla. It is very readily available in the US, even in out of the way small towns. I actually don't find that it cooks so much different than other brands, but since there are two of us, I often cook with leftover meals in mind, and it reheats wonderfully instead of turning into a mass of mush the way some pastas will, no matter how al dente you cook it the first time around.

Remember that the finer the pasta, the more important it is to taste, taste, taste. Angel hair, my personal favorite, goes for al dente to mush in seconds. With large shells or rigatoni you have more time to finesse it.

I always take my pasta off the burner and strain it when it is slightly firmer than I want it to be when I serve it. Then I very quickly strain it (not removing quite all the water) and stick it back on the still-hot burner (I have an electric stove). At that point I dress it as the last of the water evaporates and the seasonings or sauce cook in it a bit. On a gas stove it would be leaving the burner on a very low flame.

When I reaheat a pasta dish, I nuke it to temperature, then add something to make it a little different. For example, a plain spaghetti with red sauce that was vegetarian the first time around may get some sausage for a different meal. Or maybe some cream. Maybe some blue cheese and walnuts to a plain pasta that was simply prepared with dried peppers, garlic and olive oil the first time around. I find that Barilla really holds up to this treatment without falling apart.
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Old 07-15-2006, 04:47 PM   #20
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Barilla is pretty good. I usually buy De Cecco as my first choice but I'll buy Barilla if I can't find De Cecco.

Remember that the quality of the pasta does matter. If you were to prepare two pots of the same amount of salted boiling water and then cook an inferior brand like say, Golden Grain, and then comapre it to Barilla or De Cecco you will notice the difference, IF you've experienced eating good pasta. If you haven't, it doesn't matter and just buy the cheapest product.
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