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Old 03-10-2012, 10:28 AM   #1
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Pasta Alla Pesto Genovese

Good Afternoon,

Pesto takes its name from the Italian Verb Pestare, which means to polverize or pound. It is the classic sauce of the Ligurian province. Traditionally, made in a mortar and pestle, many chefs today, whip it up in a Food Processor. The Pecorino ewe milk cheese should not be too sharp, and a perfect young Pecorino Sardo shall provide the nutty flavors and only a hint of sharpness. The extraordinarie wine for this dish is: Cortese di Gavi.

I had been at the Condo in Italia, until today preparing for the Easter Holiday as the gals and kids are coming over ... So, this is a dish, I had prepared at the Condo.


4 Appetiser Size

1 large garlic clove
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 1/2 cups packed fresh basil leaves
1/2 cup freshly grated Pecorino Sardo ( 2 ounces )
5 tblsps toasted pine nuts
salt and black pepper grinded
2 tblps heavy cream
1 pound of Tagliatelli
Additional freshly grated cheese

1) finely chop the garlic in a food processor
2) with machine running, gradually add the oil in a thin steady stream
3) add basil by handfuls and blend until smooth
4) season with salt and black pepper
5) mix cream into the pesto
6) fold in remaining pine nuts
7) prepare the pasta of choice
8) mix a little of the cooking liquid with the pesto
9) add to the tagliatelli and toss

By: Margaux Cintrano.

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Old 03-10-2012, 10:46 AM   #2
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Do you heat the pesto before putting it on or mixing it into the pasta?
Do you chop / puree the pine nuts?
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:51 PM   #3
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Just Plain Bill: Clarifying Instructions

Good Afternoon, Ciao,

Firstly, to clarify the instructions and answer your 2 questions:

1) No, it is not necessary to cook the Pesto, because the cooking liquid from boiling the Pasta, Heats and Moistens the Pesto.

2) Blend the pinenuts, 1/2 cup Pecorino Sardo, cream, fresh Basil and olive oil extra virgin until a thick smooth paste. Season with salt and pepper. Fold in 1 tblsp pinenuts for crunch with the pecorino. Toss gently and serve.

Enjoy.
Margaux.
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Old 03-10-2012, 02:48 PM   #4
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Nice one, Margi!!
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Old 03-11-2012, 06:51 AM   #5
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Rock Lobster: Like the Simplicity of the Dish

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Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Nice one, Margi!!

Rock Lobster,

Firstly, thanks alot for sharing your view. Yes, me too, I truly like the simplicity of the dish ... Easy to make ... and can be divine with the right company, the right Italian style bread and a wonderful wine, white or red.

Also, it is versatile ... One can use walnuts or almonds, or hazel nuts too ... and any herb of choice preferred ... of course, then, it is not Pesto Genovese ...

Have a nice Sunday.
Margi.
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Old 03-11-2012, 07:58 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Rock Lobster,

Firstly, thanks alot for sharing your view. Yes, me too, I truly like the simplicity of the dish ... Easy to make ... and can be divine with the right company, the right Italian style bread and a wonderful wine, white or red.

Also, it is versatile ... One can use walnuts or almonds, or hazel nuts too ... and any herb of choice preferred ... of course, then, it is not Pesto Genovese ...

Have a nice Sunday.
Margi.
Should Pesto Genovese really contain basil from any particular part of Liguria?
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:16 AM   #7
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Basil & Pasta alla Genovese

Just Plain Bill:

According to connoisseurs, whom believe that only the Micro Climate in and around Genoa, Ligueria in northwestern Italia produce basil sweet enough to prepare a perfect Pesto, in other areas of Italia and other countries, well --- it would not be exactly the same in taste ...

However, I have been making this dish for years, in Italia, Spain, Greece, The USA, Punta de Este, Uruguay, Mexico, Brazil and Puerto Rico, obviously though it is not exactly the same as in Genoa --- it is still wonderful --- One can grow their own Basil and harvest the leaves before the flower buds form for a sweeter and more delicate basil.

Thanks for posting.
Margaux.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:30 AM   #8
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Margi, do you cook anguille di vetro or anguille giovani?
I've heard they are going for over $1,750 per kilo in the US!
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Old 03-11-2012, 11:36 AM   #9
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Eel ... in Spain eel is alot cheaper ... it is commonly served in the Basque Country ( Pais Vasco ) in north central Spain on the Cantabrian Coast. I have never cooked it however, I have shared it as an appetiser with " the Vet " at a Michelin Star restaurant in the Basque Country ( San Sebastian ).

There are 2 types ... gulas del norte ( reasonable priced and are very short thick thread like, in shape like a noodle used in soups, Fideos ) and angula is what you are referring to.

ANGULA is eel, a delicacy as in freshly caught. The sea snake like form of this creature could be a turn off depending on one´s cultural ethnicity ... it is still controversial.

This product is served more in Michelin Star restaurants, and it has hype, though I prefer octopus, crevettes ( carabineros ) and lobster.

What is your viewpoint on this edible ?

Margi.
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Old 03-11-2012, 11:45 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Eel ... in Spain eel is alot cheaper ... it is commonly served in the Basque Country ( Pais Vasco ) in north central Spain on the Cantabrian Coast. I have never cooked it however, I have shared it as an appetiser with " the Vet " at a Michelin Star restaurant in the Basque Country ( San Sebastian ).

There are 2 types ... gulas del norte ( reasonable priced and are very short thick thread like, in shape like a noodle used in soups, Fideos ) and angula is what you are referring to.

ANGULA is eel, a delicacy as in freshly caught. The sea snake like form of this creature could be a turn off depending on one´s cultural ethnicity ... it is still controversial.

This product is served more in Michelin Star restaurants, and it has hype, though I prefer octopus, crevettes ( carabineros ) and lobster.

What is your viewpoint on this edible ?

Margi.
First time I had it, I thought I was eating a bowl of soft spaghetti with fleck of black pepper; turned out the black pepper was the eel's eyes. It was quite tasty. I did not specifically order the dish but it was the lunchtime dish at an establishment (Tomassini's in Pisa) that I frequented often enough to have my own personal napkin.
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