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Old 11-12-2019, 10:22 AM   #1
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Pasta pot FAIL

We had a great pasta pot - no idea where i found it - the kind with the interlocking handles to use when you poured out the water. It's Teflon coated which wore out and I guess it isn't healthy to continue using it ... but I can't find one I like better!

The kind with the insert takes up too much room in the dishwasher and the others with that kind of interlocking handle gets bad reviews on Amazon.

We might just kick it old-school and go back to a colander ...

Does anyone have a pasta pot they love? Thanks all!

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Old 11-12-2019, 10:43 AM   #2
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Not me. I just cook pasta in whichever size pot is appropriate. For the two of us I use a 3.5 qt. saucier for pasta. I either use tongs to move the pasta to the sauce or a strainer.

Also, just because the non-stick coating is worn off, doesn't mean the pot is unsafe. You're just boiling water.
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Old 11-12-2019, 10:54 AM   #3
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I agree with Andy - I don't use a special pasta pot. I do have one ,but it requires way too much water to fill it up enough, so I only use it when I make big pots of stock or lasagna sauce.

I generally use a two- or three-quart saucepan to cook pasta, then a spider to move the pasta to the sauce or a strainer to drain it.
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Old 11-12-2019, 11:16 AM   #4
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Same here... I don't drain or rinse my pasta. I use a pasta spoon to remove long pasta to a plate (or a spider for stuff like ravioli, gnocchi, etc.). Then I reheat the pasta in the sauce to serve, and frequently the starchy water comes in handy to get the consistency I want.
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Old 11-12-2019, 11:25 AM   #5
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I have an eight quart pasta pot that I use for steaming multiple ears of corn.

I cook pasta in a 4-quart pot, scoop out about a cup to cup and a half of water with a mug or measuring cup, and drain the pasta into a colander before adding to the sauce.
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Old 11-12-2019, 11:41 AM   #6
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My method is similar to what all of the people above do, depending on the dish. I also have a large pasta pot that gets used for things other than pasta and not for pasta. Mine has an insert for draining. I sometimes use it for making stock, so I can take all the bones and / or vegis out of the liquid easily.
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Old 11-12-2019, 03:42 PM   #7
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Yes, taxy, it's great for making stock! I guess I forgot about that since it's 81 degrees here right now...
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Old 11-12-2019, 03:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Yes, taxy, it's great for making stock! I guess I forgot about that since it's 81 degrees here right now...
I learned, the hard way, to pull the insert out of the liquid slowly. Pull it out too fast and liquid fountains out of all the small holes.
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Old 11-12-2019, 04:20 PM   #9
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I had one a long time ago and never used it.

Its much easier for me just to boil the pasta and pour it into a colander on the sink. Also, I use differing size pots for different amounts and types of pasta
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Old 11-12-2019, 06:53 PM   #10
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I love this pot. I have the 2 quart with strainer cover also. They are great for pasta and potatoes. I have them since 2005. Lids have small holes on one side and large holes on the other.

Cuisinart 7193-20P Chef's Classic Stainless 3-Quart Cook and Pour Saucepan with Cover


$30.96

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Old 11-13-2019, 12:39 AM   #11
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I do have a SS pasta pot that came with a pasta insert and a steamer insert. I got rid of the pasta insert, but do like the steamer insert.

For the smallish batches of pasta I make for myself, I use a 5-quart stainless sauce pan.

I used to drain my pasta with a colander, but now I normally just scoop from the pasta pot right into my sauce, with some pasta water coming with it. The starch in the pasta water helps the sauce bind to the past (that's what all the chefs say, and I've seen no evidence to doubt it).

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Old 11-13-2019, 05:32 AM   #12
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I have a tall, narrower pot that is specific for pasta. I used to used it all the time until I got this huge 12 quart stock pot. I now use this cause when cooking long pasta like spaghetti, linguini.. it has enough room for the pasta to lie flat instead of sticking up vertically, therefore easier to cover with water.

I do use a colander most the time.
For smaller pastas like ziti, elbows, ravioli, tortellini ... I may scoop them up with my spider and place them directly into whatever sauce im using.

For smaller batches or smaller pastas I may not use such a large pot.
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Old 11-13-2019, 10:06 AM   #13
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If you still have the pot and the underlying metal is stainless you can remove the teflon with spray oven cleaner. You may also have to use a fine abrasive to get some of the residual in hard to work areas, but if you really like the pot and can't find a ready replacement might be worth a try.

I have done this with an All Clad saute pan I found in a thrift store maybe 12 years ago. The teflon not only was coming off, but had food stuff burned onto it, but for the $5 (incl tax) I paid for it the couple of hours of elbow grease was worth it to me.
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Old 11-13-2019, 02:31 PM   #14
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OK. Thanks all!
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Old 11-13-2019, 04:53 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
Lids have small holes on one side and large holes on the other.
Had to jump up and run to the kitchen to check the lid. Never noticed! You're right!
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