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Old 12-12-2013, 09:37 AM   #31
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Texture I Guess

The creamy factor?
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:04 AM   #32
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Mac and Cheese is another food I grew up on. Once again, it was cheap to make and it fills you up. Back then it was the main course, in fact it was the only course! Now it is considered more of a side dish.

I don't consider it a problem unless someone is eating it all the time. All things in moderation.

My take on Paula Deen....the show was entertainment. It was her job to portray southern cooking. Southern cooking is known to be high in fat and calories. It is up to the individual to know not to eat that way every day because it is not healthy. There are a lot of recipes on this forum that would be considered "unhealthy" as far as fat and calories are concerned. But we know not to eat like that at every meal, don't we?

That is just my opinion. I know there are many who disagree with me.
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:13 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by JGDean View Post
The creamy factor?
Hm. Well, the two textures don't seem all that similar to me - mornay sauce is looser than mayo - and the flavors are certainly different. I can see liking one but not the other.
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:19 AM   #34
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Hm. Well, the two textures don't seem all that similar to me - mornay sauce is looser than mayo - and the flavors are certainly different. I can see liking one but not the other.

Yes, and also the taste of cheese sauce and the taste of mayo are completely different.
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:23 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by CarolPa View Post
Mac and Cheese is another food I grew up on. Once again, it was cheap to make and it fills you up. Back then it was the main course, in fact it was the only course! Now it is considered more of a side dish.

I don't consider it a problem unless someone is eating it all the time. All things in moderation.

My take on Paula Deen....the show was entertainment. It was her job to portray southern cooking. Southern cooking is known to be high in fat and calories. It is up to the individual to know not to eat that way every day because it is not healthy. There are a lot of recipes on this forum that would be considered "unhealthy" as far as fat and calories are concerned. But we know not to eat like that at every meal, don't we?

That is just my opinion. I know there are many who disagree with me.
In the beginning, Paula Deen's recipes were not so extremely loaded with sugar, fat and calories. After a while, she essentially "jumped the shark" and became a caricature of herself.
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"Southern cooking is known to be high in fat and calories."

Compared to what? French mornay sauce? Alfredo sauce? An endless variety of German sausages? Potatoes fried in duck fat instead of pork fat? Poutine?

I think that's a cliché a lot of people have bought into, but when you really think about it, it's not all that different from other northern European cuisines.
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:24 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by CarolPa View Post

Yes, and also the taste of cheese sauce and the taste of mayo are completely different.
I think I said that
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:26 AM   #37
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I think I said that

And I was agreeing with you! Am I not allowed to repeat what you said, in agreement?
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:28 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by CarolPa View Post

And I was agreeing with you! Am I not allowed to repeat what you said, in agreement?
You are "allowed" to do whatever you want. But when you said "and also," that sounds to me like an addition, not agreement. Some people write +1 to indicate agreement. "I agree" would do it, too
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Old 12-12-2013, 12:54 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
How do you guys make your bechamel sauce? I've seen various ratios. Generally I use 2 TBSP each flour and butter to each cup of milk.

To cheese it up I'll add between 1/2 cup to 1 cup cheese depending on the strength of flavor.
CG, that's the ratio I use.

My base M&C recipe is something like this:

Cheese Sauce Ingredients:
  • 4 tbsp butter
  • 4 tbsp flour
  • 2 cups milk (for extra creaminess, I use 1 cup milk + 1 cup half and half)
  • 6-8 ounces of good melting cheese, any combination, shredded (sharp cheddar, parmigiano, gruyere, or fontina are all good choices)
  • 2 tsp kosher salt, or to taste
  • 1/2 tsp white pepper, or to taste
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
  • pinch cayenne pepper
  • 8 ounces uncooked elbow macaroni
Topping Ingredients:
  • 1/3 cup panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 tbsp butter, melted
Preparation:
  1. Preheat oven to 325
  2. Cook pasta according to package instructions
  3. Melt 4 tbsp butter in a large saucepan. Whisk in the flour and cook over medium heat, stirring often, until roux is the color of coffee with cream.
  4. Add milk one cup at a time, and whisk until there are no lumps remaining.
  5. Add salt, white pepper, ground nutmeg, and cayenne. Mix well.
  6. Turn heat to low and add cheese. Stir until cheese is melted and sauce has a smooth, velvety texture.
  7. Toss sauce with cooked pasta and transfer to a 2.5 qt casserole dish that has been sprayed with non-stick cooking spray.
  8. To make the topping, mix panko with melted butter and spread evenly over the casserole.
  9. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until bubbly and the panko topping is nicely browned.
  10. Makes 8 servings.
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Old 12-12-2013, 01:23 PM   #40
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One note on the recipe above. Although it says otherwise, I only add half the salt prior to adding the cheese. Some cheeses (parmigiano, for example) are noticeably saltier than others. After the cheese has been added, then I adjust the final seasoning.
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