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Old 01-19-2007, 11:53 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzyQ3
Well, there is a place for "discrete" rice, to be sure. But variety is the spice of life, to be trite. Different grains for different purposes. I love risotto, and i love the wonderful short- and medium-grain rices as well.
I couldn't agree more. I like basmati, jasmine, wild (although not really rice), and sushi, to name some. The original question was about avoiding clumpy rice, however, which is not very appetizing.
Basmati has been my revelation. The grains of it get longer as it cooks--and it has a lucious nutty flavor.
There is a Lundberg variety of rice I don't like--tastes like popcorn. I'd rather just have popcorn!!
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Old 01-19-2007, 12:21 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Candocook
I couldn't agree more. I like basmati, jasmine, wild (although not really rice), and sushi, to name some. The original question was about avoiding clumpy rice, however, which is not very appetizing.
Basmati has been my revelation. The grains of it get longer as it cooks--and it has a lucious nutty flavor.
There is a Lundberg variety of rice I don't like--tastes like popcorn. I'd rather just have popcorn!!
You're right that the original question was about avoiding clumpy rice. The thing about the shorter grains, like sushi and arborio, is that they're not like long grain rice cooked improperly; they're a whole different texture and feel.

If you've mostly been exposed to "regular" rice, the different varieties may indeed seem, as Candocook's husband says, like "poorly cooked rice." I used to think that risotto looked like glop myself until my husband insisted I taste and appreciate it on its own terms. Now it, and the other varieties, are favorites.

But absolutely, sometimes discrete grains of rice are just the ticket.
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Old 01-19-2007, 12:40 PM   #23
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the way I was taught, is to cook it like it grows, Plenty of water!
you must wash the rice at least 5 times by hand, scrunch the grains in plenty water until the water runs clear.
never use metal in the pot you cook rice in, wood is best, you can damage the rice with metal.
boil rapidly until VERY nearly done, using no salt in the water.
then drain the rice add your salt and whatever, put in cold water and then bring back to the boil.
drain and serve.

you can even cook "sticky rice" like this and it will end up fluffy and seperate :)

I personaly advise against oil for a fluffy type recipe, it has a habit of forcing a Gravy type liquid undesirable in such a style.

again, this is only for That texture of rice you asked about, there`s a Kazillion other types and textures to be had also, the one I mentioned it foolproof.
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Old 01-19-2007, 06:39 PM   #24
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I may get shot down in flames and banished eternally to a foodie website for the under-4s, but I cook my rice like pasta. Always have done, always will do. So there. ( Basmati is the only exception).
Plenty of hot boiling salted water. Rolling boil. Chuck in rice and boil for 14 minutes. Drain. Eat. Or save. No oil - perhaps some herbs or turmeric.

Then if I want to make (re)fried rice, it keeps perfectly separate grains.

See? I'm unrepentant!
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Old 01-21-2007, 08:18 PM   #25
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I use short grain organic brown rice. Place one cup of rice and two cups chicken broth or water. This rice has a great taste.

I use the Japanese white rice. Same. A gal from Japan introduced me to this rice and recommends the one cup rice 2 cups water ratio. This rice needs added ingredients to give it TASTE.
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Old 03-30-2007, 12:40 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cafeandy
i have cooked truckloads of rice successfully but there is still a mystery in it for me...

sometimes i like to cook rice and then embellish it later. how do you get it to have those perfect, separate grains an hour later?
I have been using the following Rice Recipe for years and it never fails- if you follow all the steps precisely.

Your rice will fluff up if you leave it standing awhile with the lid kept firmly on, and it'll keep warm for up to an hour.

The best thing you can embellish it with is a curry.

HOW TO COOK WHITE RICE


Ingredients Per Person

1/4 - 2/3 pint of thoroughly washed rice- less if your rice is still wet from rinsing.
One and a half times that amount of water.
Level teaspoon of salt per half pint of rice.
Teaspoon of butter or margarine.

Method

1. Bring the ingredients to a vigorous boil in a tightly covered pan or microwave dish.
2. Stir the rice well, replace lid and bring back to the boil.
3. Continue boiling for a few seconds then turn the heat right down and simmer for 15 minutes.
4. Take the rice off the heat and leave it to stand for 5-10 minutes before serving.
5. Enjoy!

Not wishing to criticize other methods of rice cooking, but I can honestly say that I have yet to find one online that doesn't omit an essential ingredient or step.

One thing that is not often pointed out is the amount of rinsing required to get rid of the starch. You really have to wash it so thoroughly that the water runs clear, and this can take a good few minutes.

You should also choose the best rice available, which in my opinion is Basmati, preferably Super Kernel Basmati from the foothills of the Himalayas. Sounds exotic but costs only pennies more.

Adding butter or margarine will make your rice taste better, and so will some salt.

Cooking your rice in the microwave is recommended if you don't want to lose any due to it sticking to the saucepan.

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