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Old 02-19-2006, 10:50 AM   #1
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Perfect rice

i have cooked truckloads of rice successfully but there is still a mystery in it for me...

sometimes i like to cook rice and then embellish it later. how do you get it to have those perfect, separate grains an hour later?

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Old 02-19-2006, 11:34 AM   #2
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Different types of rice have differerent results. I prefer basmati for that 'separate grains' results, also, a tbspoon of oil helps separate the grains. This is how I cook my rice. For every cup of rice, I use two cups of water, I salt the water, add oil, then when boiled, I add the rice and then simmer with the lid on.
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Old 02-19-2006, 11:38 AM   #3
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When I lived in Louisiana, I was taught to rinse the rice first. That gets the excess starch off of the outside, and it won't be sticky.
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Old 02-19-2006, 12:24 PM   #4
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I always forget to rinse my rice. Making a mental note to do that so I have separate grains. I think Jikoni's suggestion would work well too.
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Old 02-19-2006, 02:18 PM   #5
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Yes, I recommend rinsing.

But I also suggest buying a dedicated rice cooker. They can be had for not very much money at all at an oriental shop.

I usually use 2 cups of rice to 3 cups of water and that works fine.

I agree with what was said about the type of rice being important.
You might wish to experiment.

Best regards,
Alex R.
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Old 02-19-2006, 06:53 PM   #6
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Each bag of rice you will buy will absorb different amounts of liquid (depending on type, whether it is new or old crop rice), it takes a few attempts to get the right amount of liquid needed with a new bag of rice.

As people have mentioned previously rinsing the rice (you generally do this until the water runs clear, also vitally important to really shake all the water used to rinse it out, otherwise it might turn out too soggy due to excess liquid) is important. Rinsing is especially important if you are going to cook a rice pilaf (or pilau depending on your spelling), without rinsing a pilaf it can turn out quite gluggy even if the right amount of liquid is used.
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Old 02-19-2006, 07:52 PM   #7
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gluggy?...i luv that word...
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Old 01-17-2007, 07:56 PM   #8
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I am sure this will sound like a stupid question but here goes anyway. I am thinking about getting a rice cooker. We use brown rice, that should cook fine in a rice cooker, right? I just find that it takes longer with brown rice on the stove. The brown rice is the reason I was thinking about a rice cooker. Thanks
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Old 01-17-2007, 08:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stinker
I am sure this will sound like a stupid question but here goes anyway. I am thinking about getting a rice cooker. We use brown rice, that should cook fine in a rice cooker, right? I just find that it takes longer with brown rice on the stove. The brown rice is the reason I was thinking about a rice cooker. Thanks
Stinker, you should check out the rice cooker thread, still going strong.

I love my rice cooker (10-cup Panasonic fuzzy logic), but it doesn't cook rice any faster. In fact, unless I use the "quick cycle," my model actually takes longer than on the stove because it includes a soak cycle. That is true on mine for both white and brown rice.

I've cooked brown rice, along with many other varieties, and I have always been totally pleased with the results. And I love how it keeps rice warm for hours, even though I've never let mine sit for more than a couple.
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Old 01-17-2007, 09:14 PM   #10
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I prefer basmati for non-sticky rice. Last time I bought rice, however, I grabbed the wrong bag and it turned out to be arborio rice. Apparently, what makes some rice stickier than others is their gluten content. So while the arborio would probably be good if I wanted to make risotto, its not so great for plain old white rice.
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