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Old 12-02-2005, 01:48 AM   #1
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Pesto Cavatappi

PESTO CAVATAPPI



Curly pasta tubes sautéed in olive oil and tossed with basil pesto, mushroom, roma tomato, white wine and a dash of cream. Finished with shredded parmesan

Ok this is a dish from a fast food chain called noodles and company
www.noodles.com

I went to kopy cat recipes, and it did not have the recipe for it. I love italian food, but i dont know anything about what pesto means. Does pesto mean sauce or just pasta? I get this dish all the time, but I want to substitute some ingredients. Insteat of using curly pasta tubes, i am going to use organic whole wheat pasta. I dont like parmasean cheese, so i am going to take that out. In terms of apperance, it looks like the curly pasta tubes are bathed in some green sauce, so i am guessing the green sauce is composed of:

-Basil Leaves
-Heavy Cream
-Olive Oil
-Salt
-White wine
-Mushroom
-Tomato

I am not sure how much of each i am suppose to use. Has anyone else tried this in the chicago area?

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Old 12-02-2005, 09:05 AM   #2
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Pesto is a sauce, made from basil, garlic, salt, parmesan, and some pine nuts, pureed in olive oil. It's used to lightly coat pasta with. Traditionally, I believe it's a summer thing, as that's when fresh basil is available.

I don't really have any quantities for the ingredients, as I make pesto to taste, in small quantities. I made some a few months ago with the last of my basil crop, and froze it in ice cubes. The pesto cubes are in a ziplock baggie in my deep-freezer.
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Old 12-02-2005, 09:43 AM   #3
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This is the approximated composition of the pesto. I wouldn't use cream or wine in pesto, I am afraid they will clash with the other traditional ingredients. You can add some tomatoes and/or sautèed mushrooms afterwards with pasta if you like. You just blend the following item in a blender, but you just have to kinda taste it as you go to attain the flavour you look for. If you don't care for parmigiano, go for aged pecorino, it is even better.


-fresh basil leaves separated from the stem and well rinsed, then well drained
-Extra virgin olive oil, make sure it is a good quality. about 3/4 of amount (in grams/ozs) of the leaves.
(please experiment with the amount of below items, adding them gradually... to your personal taste...for a rough measure I use about 75g of cheese, 2 big cloves of garlic 75g of nuts to make about 1lb. of pesto)
-well seasoned parmigiano or pecorino cheese, freshly ground
-cloves of garlic
-mixture of pine nuts and cashew

And Allen is right, this is best made during the warmer months when fresh basils are plentiful. Even if you can find them during the winter, the intensity of the flavour is nothing like the one in summer. If it is packaged right pesto also freezes very well, too.
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Old 12-02-2005, 12:46 PM   #4
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If I recall, Parmegiano Regiano is made from cow-milk, while anything Pecorino comes from sheeps milk. The most well known pecorino cheese in the U.S. is Romano, which refers to the cheese' origin of ancient Rome. This is a saltier cheese than is Parmegiano Regiano.

And the difference between Parmegiano Regiano and Parmesan cheese is that the former is aged for about 24 months and has a richer, more complex flavor. The curd is cut more coarsely, allowing natural draining of the whey. The more common, and cheaper Parmesan is cut finer and requires mechanical pressing to remove much of the moisture. It is also aged for half the time and contains more salt.

Parmegiano Regiano is a protected variety of cheese that has to meet rigorous standards before it earns its name. The same isn't true of Parmesan Cheese.

Just a bit of info for all.

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Old 12-02-2005, 08:51 PM   #5
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OK thanks you guys, but whenever i order that dish, i do not add any cheese to it. i dont like parmesian cheese at all. I am more interested in trying to find what the ingrediants are, and what the technique is to make that sauce as close as possible. I will just have to try it out at home, ill keep you guys updated.
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Old 12-02-2005, 11:14 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
If I recall, Parmegiano Regiano is made from cow-milk, while anything Pecorino comes from sheeps milk. The most well known pecorino cheese in the U.S. is Romano, which refers to the cheese' origin of ancient Rome. This is a saltier cheese than is Parmegiano Regiano.

And the difference between Parmegiano Regiano and Parmesan cheese is that the former is aged for about 24 months and has a richer, more complex flavor. The curd is cut more coarsely, allowing natural draining of the whey. The more common, and cheaper Parmesan is cut finer and requires mechanical pressing to remove much of the moisture. It is also aged for half the time and contains more salt.

Parmegiano Regiano is a protected variety of cheese that has to meet rigorous standards before it earns its name. The same isn't true of Parmesan Cheese.

Just a bit of info for all.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

I have long wanted to try some Parmegiano Regiano, but the last I saw, it was $25 a lb.
I'm sorry, but my pockets are not that deep.
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Old 12-03-2005, 10:14 PM   #7
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Like your own, my pockets are rather shallow as well, and my children and wife tend to dip into them often, as does the electric company, car insurance agent, gas company, etc. But just once in a great while, I'll splurge and purchase a very good chunk of cheese, for between 6 and 8 bucks. That cheese will be savored, and used sparingly. Whether it's Parmegiano Regiano, or a 5 year aged heritage cheddar, you can bet that it's carefully kept, and reserved for that just right, indulgent moment, sometimes shared with family, and sometimes savored alone (usually shared, though I have the wonderous situation that I'm the only one that loves super-sharp, perfect cheddar. Everyone else in the house likes either mild or medium.)

So, don't derprive yourself of good things, but rather, purchase and use sparingly, and when you have a bit of excess pocket change.

Someday, I will try a true, aged balsamic vinager, and real truffles, not to mention true, wild morels. I can already get the best blueberries on the planet. I just have to wait for August to roll around.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-04-2005, 08:33 AM   #8
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What a great post, Goodweed!

I do as you, and splurge on a piece of imported cheese a couple of times of year (I, too, am the only one in my house that prefers aged, drier cheeses to the milder, moister varieties).

And all the things on your wishlist are on mine, too! Plus a LOT more! :-)

Lee
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Old 12-04-2005, 08:49 AM   #9
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Buffwannabee,

As was said above, the ingredients in basil pesto, which is what you said is used in the dish you love, include parmesan and/or romano cheese. Leaving it out will change the taste of the recipe significantly.

Anyway, here is a simple recipe for basil pesto (there are many).

Note: Pesto does NOT include mushrooms, cream, wine, or tomatoes. Your restaurant tosses the pasta with all those ingredients along with the pesto, before they serve it.

Lee


FRESH BASIL PESTO
2 c. packed fresh basil leaves, minced
2 lg. cloves garlic, sliced
1/2 c. pine nuts or walnuts
3/4 c. freshly grated Parmesan cheese
2/3 c. olive oil

Place all ingredients in blender and process until smooth. Transfer to jar and cover with film of olive oil. Seal with tight fitting lid. Refrigerate up to 3 months or freeze. Stir oil into pesto before using.
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Old 12-06-2005, 06:01 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
I have long wanted to try some Parmegiano Regiano, but the last I saw, it was $25 a lb.
I'm sorry, but my pockets are not that deep.
Connie, Goodweed is so right... it is well worth a try on a special occasion with a special recipe!! Also you maybe surprised at the intensity of its flavour, so you may not have to use as much as you would imagine. In any case I assure you that you won't regret your investment!! The only problem might be that after you tried real Parmigiano Regiano, those Kraft stuff that come in the green can would taste hopelessly pale... I hope you will be able to find a happy medium in a good deli for a regular usage!!
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