"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-24-2010, 01:53 PM   #1
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Pilaf

Many people hear the term pilaf and think of a rice dish with an assortment of meats and veggies, and possibly seasonings. But Pilaf isn't a recipe, it's a way of cooking grains such as rice, wheat, quinua, etc. A pilaf is typically made by browning the grain in hot oil, then adding a broth or stock, and seasonings, then boiling until the grain is completely cooked. It can be done completely on the stovetop, or in the oven.

A dish we call "Ralph" is actually a rice pilaf made with rice, chicken stock, diced chicken, ground beef, celery, vermicelli, and onion. The stock has to be fairly strong to sufficiently flavor the rice. Originally, it was made by browning the rice and veggies in a casserole dish, in the oven, adding finely diced chicken, Browned ground beef, vermicelli, and broth, then covering tightly and baking for about 40 minutes. I now make it entirely on the stove top by browning the rice, adding the chicken broth and powdered thyme. I stir it all together, cover, and simmer for twenty to thirty minutes.

The amount of rice compared to water is 3 cups water to 1 cup uncooked rice. This extra water is needed by the vermicelli.

I wonder how this pilaf would be if I used cracked whet instead of rice, or maybe steel cut oats, or even groats. Hmmmm.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2010, 03:09 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,884
I've never liked my own pilaf so I'm very interested in this post, Goodweed. How much vermicelli do you use in relationship to one cup of uncooked rice, and what do you think about using orzo instead?
__________________

__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2010, 05:24 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I would use about 1/3 cup vermicelli , or orzo (that would be an amazing texture )were I to make this recipe from scratch. A faster, more foolproof way to make this pilaf is as follows:

1 lb. ground beef, browned.
1 stalk celery, sliced
1 onion, diced
1 cup long grain rice
2 tbs. cooking oil
1 pkg. Lipton's chicken noodle soup with chicken
3 1/2 cups water
1/2 tsp. ground black pepper (optional)
1/8 tsp. ground thyme (optional)

Place the oil in a two quart and heat until fragrant. Add the rice. Stir until the rice just begins to turn lightly brown. Add all of the water and bring to a boil. Let boil over medium heat for ten minutes. Turn heat to simmer and add the remaining ingredients. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes more.

I have also made this dish and added sliced carrot. Snow peas would be a great addition as well. Serve with butter.

I like this version as much as the from scratch version. Of course, me being me, I had to learn to make it from scratch, making my own chicken broth, and adding various herbs and seasonings. It's not better. It's just mine, because I don't follow a recipe when making from scratch.

This can also be made from brown rice, but takes twenty minutes longer to cook, and the addition of 3/4 cup extra water.

Oh, and about that orzo, I have made a similar dish using only orzo and no rice. Cooking the orzo in the chicken broth was amazing. You can also make this dish with beef stock and it is very good. Simply change the seasonings a bit, and add a bit of Kikoman Lite, or any high quality, light soy sauce, and maybe some mushrooms. It's all about the umami with the beef version.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2010, 07:31 PM   #4
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,375
Goodweed, I grew up eating rice pilaf and encourage you to try making it with fine ground bulgar wheat. No changes to the recipe are necessary, just sub the wheat for the rice.

It's also vey good with brown rice but takes a little more liquid and about twice the time.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2010, 09:03 AM   #5
Sous Chef
 
radhuni's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Calcutta, India
Posts: 958
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Many people hear the term pilaf and think of a rice dish with an assortment of meats and veggies, and possibly seasonings. But Pilaf isn't a recipe, it's a way of cooking grains such as rice, wheat, quinua, etc. A pilaf is typically made by browning the grain in hot oil, then adding a broth or stock, and seasonings, then boiling until the grain is completely cooked. It can be done completely on the stovetop, or in the oven.

A dish we call "Ralph" is actually a rice pilaf made with rice, chicken stock, diced chicken, ground beef, celery, vermicelli, and onion. The stock has to be fairly strong to sufficiently flavor the rice. Originally, it was made by browning the rice and veggies in a casserole dish, in the oven, adding finely diced chicken, Browned ground beef, vermicelli, and broth, then covering tightly and baking for about 40 minutes. I now make it entirely on the stove top by browning the rice, adding the chicken broth and powdered thyme. I stir it all together, cover, and simmer for twenty to thirty minutes.

The amount of rice compared to water is 3 cups water to 1 cup uncooked rice. This extra water is needed by the vermicelli.

I wonder how this pilaf would be if I used cracked whet instead of rice, or maybe steel cut oats, or even groats. Hmmmm.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Really thanks for the information. I thought that pilaf is equivalent of our Indian 'pulao'
radhuni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2010, 12:58 PM   #6
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,291
Barley Pilaf, Quinoa Pilaf...I think any grain would be acceptable. Now I want pilaf for dinner.
__________________

__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.