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Old 11-08-2008, 06:54 PM   #11
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That's interesting, & supports my "it's really just semantics". Is it just plain cooked cornmeal, Miniman, or do you add something to it, like seasonings, before it's known as "sudza"?
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Old 11-08-2008, 09:39 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
First Cousins.......
Exactly. Both are cornmeal mush.
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Old 11-08-2008, 10:16 PM   #13
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Cornmeal, (finely ground corn) cooked/boiled in liquid, --- water, milk, stocks, etc to some consistency, eaten hot or cold is/has been part of the food ways of just about every culture in the world. The “dish” goes by dozens of names…In Italy --- Polenta -- Where it was once considered a peasant food. It is now, in some circles considered Hoity Toity fare and served in the finest restaurants. --- Here I’ve heard it referred to as cornmeal mush (I’ve never eaten it) or Coush-Coush – The Cajun Breakfast of Champions. (I have eaten this) Today, in my area some of its popular uses are: to make cornbread, cornbread dressing, and as a breading for fried foods – Fish and okra come to mind. Cornmeal is NOT grits!

Stone Ground Grits…Are produced when whole kernel corn is ground in a Grist mill. When a grits separator is in place the grits are separated from the meal that falls through to the bottom due to its fineness. These Stone Ground grits are full of corn flavor. If you don’t have a minimum of 30 minutes…45 is better…an hour won’t hurt – then don’t even attempt to cook them. They are delicious – Just don’t try to make cornbread out of them. Stone Ground Grits are NOT cornmeal --- Stone Ground Grits are not cornmeal mush!

Hominy Grits….Are produced from dried Hominy that is ground into tiny particles.
You can read about hominy here --- They are advertised to cook in 5 minutes --- 15-20 minutes is much, much better. . They are NOT cornmeal ---They are NOT Stone Ground grits…They are NOT cornmeal mush….You can't make cornbread out of them!!! HTH !!
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Old 11-08-2008, 10:34 PM   #14
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Back in the '70's - long before I'd even heard of "polenta", one of my favorite weekend breakfasts included "fried cornmeal mush". I'd usually make it the night before & just stick the pot in the fridge overnight. Then in the morning I'd slice it up & fry it - along with eggs & ham - in enough butter to make my arteries congeal just thinking about it - lol!! Ahh - my misspent youth!
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Old 11-11-2008, 09:17 AM   #15
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Thanks for the response guys.
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Old 11-11-2008, 10:22 AM   #16
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I'm going to say after having this Sunday evening... it is grits!
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Old 11-11-2008, 10:45 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
As they say,the difference between polenta nad grits is how much a restaurant can charge for it. Polenta can be made frim and sliced (and grilled or fried) or it can be a looser cionsistency similar to grits.
Not exactly. Grits are short for "hominy grits," and hominy grits have been treated with lye.

Polenta is not treated that way. They are very similar, however, and in many places are used interchangeably.
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Old 11-11-2008, 11:46 AM   #18
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Grits are white....polenta is yeller....otherwise the same thing...

Hominy grits are a whole differn't thang....
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Old 11-11-2008, 11:57 AM   #19
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Not exactly. Grits are short for "hominy grits," and hominy grits have been treated with lye.

Polenta is not treated that way. They are very similar, however, and in many places are used interchangeably.

Not exactly. There are grits and hominy grits. Two different things. Grits and polenta differ little.
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Old 11-11-2008, 01:34 PM   #20
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Wow, I guess Uncle Bob wasn't too convincing with his explanation, as the debate rages on.

BTW, I WAS joking about the Mason-Dixon Line. Just trying to put a little levity into the conversation. I'm going back to the bread page before things get really heated up here and I get deep fried or boiled.
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