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Old 11-11-2008, 03:15 PM   #31
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Too right Abc! Unfortunately.
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Old 11-11-2008, 03:17 PM   #32
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Andy, pmfji...but he is talking about "coush coush", not "cous cous"...they aren't the same thing...
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Old 11-11-2008, 03:25 PM   #33
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Andy, pmfji...but he is talking about "coush coush", not "cous cous"...they aren't the same thing...
Thanks, at least I haven't totally lost my feeble grip on reality.
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Old 11-11-2008, 03:26 PM   #34
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Stone Ground Grits can be Yellow or White-----
Hominy Grits are white ------
Polenta can be Yellow or White -----
So far, Uncle Bob (per above) is virtually the ONLY one here, out of 4 pages, that has it 100% correct. The rest of you need to get out more - lol!!
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Old 11-11-2008, 04:20 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by Baketech View Post
Andy, pmfji...but he is talking about "coush coush", not "cous cous"...they aren't the same thing...

Man, was I ever way off base. Sorry guys. I think I'll go sit in the corner for a while.
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Old 11-11-2008, 04:23 PM   #36
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Man, was I ever way off base. Sorry guys. I think I'll go sit in the corner for a while.
What, and miss out on a classic "big end vs little end" discussion...pish...
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Old 11-20-2008, 09:57 AM   #37
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Here we serve polenta in a dish with stuffed porcini (mushroooms),red beef,we make a dressing sauce with stuffed onions,olive oil,mushrooms,some tomatoe sauce,pepper,as always,all these ingredients need to be stirred for at least 45 minutes, in a big and large pot.
Polenta needs to cooked in a separate pot with a lot of hot water.
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Old 12-29-2008, 10:07 AM   #38
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About Polenta

I'm not going to get into a discussion about girts vs. polenta but I want to clarify a couple of inaccurate statements made here about polenta.

In an earlier message it was stated that polenta is yellow and grits are white. True - but there is also white polenta. Moretti makes Polenta Bramata which is yellow and Bramata Bianca which is white. There is only a slight difference in taste. I've attached some pictures of the packages.

Polenta is served in many different ways - not just sliced and fried. When polenta is allowed to cool and get firm it can be sliced, broiled, fried etc etc. Lately it's become trendy to use little rounds of firm polenta as a base for appetizers and canapes.

Traditionally, in Ialian-American households it is cooked to a thick mush and served with tomato sauce (with meatballs, sausage, trippa etc). In years past it was served communally on a board in the center of the table. Everyone would take a fork and eat their way to the middle.

Polenta can also be served in a very creamy preparation. The longer polenta cooks the smoother it gets. Here's a favorite way of mine for preparintg polenta. The recipe calls for yellow cornmeal but I also use white polenta for this.

Polenta and Kale

4 cups water
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1 pound kale, stemmed and cut into 1 inch pieces
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
Salt and pepper to taste
1 cup grated Romano cheese

In a medium saucepan bring salted water to a boil. Add cornmeal to the boiling water in a slow steady stream stirring constantly. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 to 45 minutes stirring very frequently (almost constantly), until a smooth and creamy consistency is reached.

While the polenta is cooking, steam the kale until tender. When the kale is cooked, heat oil in a skillet large enough to hold all the kale. Add garlic and sautÚ briefly. Add kale and continue to sautÚ for another minute or so, tossing to coat the kale with oil. Salt and pepper to taste. When the polenta is cooked stir in grated Romano cheese. Pour polenta into the middle of a serving dish. Top with sautÚd kale and serve. Serves 4 as a side dish.
Attached Images
  
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Old 12-29-2008, 10:17 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim C
In an earlier message it was stated that polenta is yellow and grits are white. True - but there is also white polenta.
Jim, I'm sure you didn't mean to infer that grits are only white, but for clarification Grits (Stone Ground) can be yellow or white also -- depending on the corn that's used.

Have Fun & Enjoy!
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Old 12-29-2008, 11:35 AM   #40
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Wow, I guess Uncle Bob wasn't too convincing with his explanation, as the debate rages on.

BTW, I WAS joking about the Mason-Dixon Line. Just trying to put a little levity into the conversation. I'm going back to the bread page before things get really heated up here and I get deep fried or boiled.
By your use of smilies, I knew you were joking and as I have gotten to know you here I have learned more about your sense of humor. I don't believe you are trying to start anything and I have witnessed more of these North/South foodie arguments than I care to remember.

On my old board there were ridiculous arguments over whether cornbread should have sugar in it. Evidently, "real cornbread" does not contain sugar if you are from the South. What I never understood is why people can't make the kind of cornbread or journeycake they desire? Just enjoy! Vive la difference!!!
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