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Old 09-23-2013, 11:10 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Desmond View Post
Come on guys -> RTFM
I have downloaded the manual and as I said previously it does not give any times for cooking rice. It gives times for cooking carrots and fish etc but not rice. Contacted manufacturer and they seem clueless. What I wanted is some people professional knowledge of cooking large amounts of rice i.e. 1kg of rice to one litre of water. I didn’t think it would be this hard a question. :(
Your post got me curious and I pulled out the manual to our rice cooker. Interestingly enough ours doesn't note any cooking times. Just turn it on and it's supposed to finish when it "senses" the rice is done. I never thought about that until now.

I suppose you could cook a small test batch of rice and extrapolate the time for a larger quantity. Other than that I have no idea.
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:05 PM   #12
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I have never used a rice cooker other than a pot of boiling water. The ratio is 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water, which generally yields about 3 cups of cooked rice. It's an old fashioned way to cook rice I reckon, but it works.
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:06 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Desmond View Post
Come on guys -> RTFM
I have downloaded the manual and as I said previously it does not give any times for cooking rice. It gives times for cooking carrots and fish etc but not rice. Contacted manufacturer and they seem clueless. What I wanted is some people professional knowledge of cooking large amounts of rice i.e. 1kg of rice to one litre of water. I didn’t think it would be this hard a question. :(

Why would anyone cook carrots or fish in a rice cooker?
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:18 PM   #14
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Why would anyone cook carrots or fish in a rice cooker?
Because you can.
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:36 PM   #15
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I cook potatoes in mine for potato salad and have steamed other veggies in it, too. It is a bit more convenient than babysitting a pot on the stove. At least, it is for me.
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:47 PM   #16
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There really a simple solution. Measure the rice volume. Wash and rinse your rice. Place it into a large pot. Fill pot with water to equal three times the volume of the rice, i.e. 1 cup of rice to 3 cups of water.

A rice cooker is designed around using twice the water volume, compared to the rice. That is enough water to completely hydrate the rice during the cooking time. The method I'm suggesting uses time to gauge the proper hydration of the rice, and is the preferred method as any excess water is drained off, carrying with it any heavy metal, or pesticide residuals that may contaminate the rice.

Bring the water to a boil, cover the pot, and reduce the heat just to maintain a low boil. Cook for 30 minutes, then drain through a fine mesh seive. Your rice will be cooked through, and be healthier to eat. If you want your rice to have a bit of tooth, reduce the cooking time by seven minutes or so. If you want it very soft, increase the cooking time by another 7 to ten minutes.

No guesswork required.

Oh, and season the water with salt.

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Old 09-23-2013, 03:48 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Why would anyone cook carrots or fish in a rice cooker?

A rice cooker is, by design, a food steamer. I steam vegetables in mine all the time. My fsh, I prefer sauteed or deep fried.

BTW, my rice cooker/vegetable steamer is also a slow cooker, and I can make Irish oatmeal to perfection in it also.

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Old 09-23-2013, 03:56 PM   #18
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The rice cooker is designed to cook rice automatically, without human intervention. The operator is not required to time the cooking process. You put the rice and cooking liquid in the bucket, push the RICE button and walk away. When the rice is cooked, it will stop the cooking process but continue to keep the cooked rice warm until you yank the plug out of the wall.
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Old 10-04-2013, 07:12 AM   #19
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I have never used a rice cooker other than a pot of boiling water. The ratio is 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water, which generally yields about 3 cups of cooked rice. It's an old fashioned way to cook rice I reckon, but it works.
I've recently discovered cooking rice in the m/wave using Hoot's proportions. No quicker than boiling in a pan but it's one thing less to have your eye on in the kitchen
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Old 10-04-2013, 07:20 AM   #20
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I have never used a rice cooker other than a pot of boiling water. The ratio is 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water, which generally yields about 3 cups of cooked rice. It's an old fashioned way to cook rice I reckon, but it works.
I use the Hoot method, works every time and reduces the clutter in my tiny kitchen.
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