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Old 10-03-2011, 08:11 AM   #11
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I also get straight vermicelli/angelhair pasta. I just grab a nice bunch, place it into a large bowl (to help with the fly aways) and snap it into small lenghts. I never measure, it doesn't have to be uniform. I just recently found imported angelhair nests. I will probably place it into a ziplok bag and just crush it.
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:50 AM   #12
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It has to be uniform for me

Seriously, I'd at least like it close, without having to pick 2" pcs out and break them a few more times individually.
I'll have to play around with this and develop a technique.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:09 AM   #13
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Breaking up the straight angel hair or vermicelli is a pain. Especially if you want the pieces to be uniform.

I buy this and just crush them one at a time in my hands:
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:47 AM   #14
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When you said that you used the nests I had a feeling they would break "better" just by the nature of being curved and three dimensional.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:50 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
When you said that you used the nests I had a feeling they would break "better" just by the nature of being curved and three dimensional.
...and they fit nicely in the palm of your hand.
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Old 10-03-2011, 01:48 PM   #16
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I imagine the ratio of rice to pasta is important to the outcome of this dish. It sounds wonderful, but how much is a "nest" or "nice bunch" of pasta when using one cup of rice?

TIA!
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Old 10-03-2011, 01:58 PM   #17
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I imagine the ratio of rice to pasta is important to the outcome of this dish. It sounds wonderful, but how much is a "nest" or "nice bunch" of pasta when using one cup of rice?

TIA!
The nests I use (pictured above) are about one ounce each. I use two for a cup of rice. So two ounces of straight angel hair would be fine. I've also seen it made with vermicelli (a little thicker than angel hair) or even spaghetti in a pinch. Orzo would also work.
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Old 10-03-2011, 02:03 PM   #18
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The nests I use (pictured above) are about one ounce each. I use two for a cup of rice. So two ounces of straight angel hair would be fine. I've also seen it made with vermicelli (a little thicker than angel hair) or even spaghetti in a pinch. Orzo would also work.
Thank you Andy! This one will be made in my home! I always watch carefully for your recipes. Your tastes seem to coincide with my own.
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Old 10-03-2011, 03:15 PM   #19
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Thank you Andy! This one will be made in my home! I always watch carefully for your recipes. Your tastes seem to coincide with my own.

Thanks. We also both like sushi, although you're eons ahead of me in expertise.
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Old 10-03-2011, 03:29 PM   #20
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interesting quick wiki-search tidbit...

pilaf is called pilaf, with minor variations in pronunciation and accent, in just about every language and corner of the world. talk about the universality of food!
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Rice Pilaf There are as many recipes for pilaf as there are cooks who make it. What follows is my mom's recipe that I grew up on. Pilaf [COLOR=black][FONT=Arial] [/FONT][/COLOR] [FONT=Arial]1 C Rice, long grain[/FONT] [FONT=Arial]4 Tb Butter[/FONT] [FONT=Arial]2 Nests of Angel Hair Pasta[/FONT] [FONT=Arial]2 C Chicken Broth[/FONT] [FONT=Arial]Thoroughly rinse and drain the rice.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial]Melt the butter in a 2-quart pan. Crumble the pasta nests into the butter. Brown the pasta in the butter. The butter and the noodles should turn a fairly dark brown (more than golden brown but less than burned). It is the browning of the butter and noodles that really gives the pilaf its flavor.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial]Add the rice and cook over medium to medium low heat for a few minutes, stirring occasionally.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial]Add the broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce to a simmer, and cook, covered, for 25 minutes. Don't open the pan to look or stir.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial]At the end of the cooking time, turn off the burner and let it rest in the pan (covered) for 5 to 10 minutes before serving.[/FONT][I][FONT=Arial] [/FONT][/I] 3 stars 1 reviews
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