"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-12-2003, 10:17 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
carnivore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: the great fly-over
Posts: 291
Rice with flavor?

Rice is one of those foods that i don't necessarily love, but i don't dislike it at all. It's almost like drinking a (very filling) glass of water.
I manage to visit a good steak house every now and then (usually on vacation) and I always order some type of rice as a side--wild rice is my favorite. The rice I get in these places always has a very good taste to it, while the rice I make at home is always very bland.
I have probably tried 10 different ways of making rice (including the extremely anal "true" Japanese way) without noticing a difference in flavor. I've tried adding herbs and several other ingredients to try to add some flavor to my rice. The only thing that I've found that works is boiling the rice in chicken stock instead of water, as I learned from making risotto. But this still does not provide the 'depth of taste' i'm looking for.

Long story short: does anyone have any methods/recipes for cooking good, plain rice that is flavorful but subtle?
thanks,

__________________

__________________
carnivore

Wine in a box is better than no wine at all.
carnivore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2003, 01:37 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
well for the most part, unless you make risotto or a pilaf, rice is never going to have a big. bold flavor like a pasta, or potato side dish. You could make a jambalaya or paella, but that in itself is usually the dish and not served as a side. if you can look just for natural taste and quality in the rice, and not be expecting a big, butter-filled experience, than you could go with jasmine or basmati rice which has a really nice, subtle flavor and aroma.

but basically, the reason why the rice you may get at say, morton's or ruth chris is different, is because they add a ton of butter to it
__________________

__________________
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2003, 02:10 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Cooking rice...variations

Could the depth of flavor I think you are referring to actually be what they add AFTER the rice is cooked?

But, for a simple flavorful rice I will take the amount of rice I want to use and saute until a light brown in some oil, add my already sauteed diced onion, add the appropriate amount of chicken stock, and a few sprigs of thyme. This is really good with adobo.

If I want a spiced rice (which I like with curry dishes) I will add some sticks of cinnamon, whole cloves and remove these when rice is done) then add a generous amount of golden raisins. I still use chicken stock here too.

If you like cilantro you can add some fresh as it is cooking - but it takes a lot to impart the flavor (or maybe it just takes a lot for me because I love the flavor).

Butter is a big factor (and salt) but I usually add olive oil and salt. Usually I do use chicken or beef broth instead of water.

What are the names of the places you have eaten this rice that is so good? The curious want to know? :P
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2004, 06:41 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
carnivore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: the great fly-over
Posts: 291
i tried something last night on a whim, and really liked the results. i added a few ingredients to the water i cooked my rice in: white wine, chicken boullion granules, white pepper, and a little more salt than i normally use. i cooked my rice in much less water than i normally would and left it uncovered (the point being to try to 'time' it so that the rice would be cooked at the same time almost all the liquid had evaporated from the pot.)
I added pretty modest quantites of the extra ingredients, and while the flavor was not drastically different from the rices i normally make, it was enough to write down :D
Nothing earth-shatteringingly different, but I'll probably keep building on this for awhile.
__________________
carnivore

Wine in a box is better than no wine at all.
carnivore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2004, 07:53 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Good idea carnivore. I usually use the "water/liquid to the first knuckle" method. Cover and simmer for about 20 minutes. If liquid is not absorbed then just leave lid off and continue cooking until you don't hear the "crackling" anymore.

Next time try browning a chopped onion is the rice pot, remove the onion; add a little oil and brown the rice; once the rice is brown add the salt, cooked onion, about 7-10 sprigs of fresh thyme, and chicken broth (I use the low sodium because I think it has more flavor). You will LOVE the thyme flavor. My favorite thing to have with this is Chicken Adobo - really, really good.

I think you will find that this rice has a little more flavor. Also, did you see my recipe for Spiced Rice with my Chicken Curry recipe? Now that's some good rice. But if you don't like raisins try some other dried fruit, even cranberries would be good - that sweetness really adds to the taste.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2004, 10:35 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
carnivore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: the great fly-over
Posts: 291
hey Kelf,
i haven't heard of the water to the first knuckle method before--it sounds self-explanatory but would you be willing to elaborate?
Just found the chicken curry recipe--that's on my list as well! (unfortunately my list has grown to 4 pages now, as i have received a plethora of cookbooks within the last month...i can't even find places to store them all :|
__________________
carnivore

Wine in a box is better than no wine at all.
carnivore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2004, 10:40 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Sure, I'll try to explain. I was taught to always rinse the rice 3 times (the water doesn't have to be completely drained each time). Then just add your rice to the pot, say 2 cups, and add enough water so when your fingers touch the bottom of the pan (beneath the rice) the water level comes up to the first knuckle joint of your middle finger.

Now, if I am making a really large batch of rice I will put my fingers on top of the rice (only going slightly below the top though) and then add water to the first joint of my middle finger.

Works like a charm every time. Oh, and that would be water, or chicken broth, or even beef broth.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2004, 10:46 PM   #8
Senior Cook
 
carnivore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: the great fly-over
Posts: 291
thanks kitchenelf,
that's kind of what i figured, but i was thinking that the size of the pot could make a huge difference with that measurement (this from a guy who measures ingredients in the palm of his hand )
about what size pot do you normally use when making rice?
sorry for all the questions :oops:
__________________
carnivore

Wine in a box is better than no wine at all.
carnivore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2004, 10:55 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
No problem carnivore!!

I use about a 2 quart pot for 2 cups of rice. You don't want the surface to be too large or it will cook the water out too fast, and just the opposite if the pan is too small. If I'm cooking 4 cups of rice I use my 5 quart pot. Dutch ovens have too big a surface so it's usually some form of saucepan.

And cook your rice covered, don't stir it ever, and don't take the lid off. Wait for the 20 minutes, remove the lid, then listen. Test the upper rice, if it's a little crunchy put the lid back on (add a tad more boiling water if necessary) and if it is done but there is still water just let it cook without the lid. Sometimes I test with a knife inserted in the middle so I can look to the bottom of the pan to make sure all the water is gone.

If you ever burn your rice leave the burned part on the bottom and put your rice in a bowl and place some onion peels all over the top. Let it sit covered for maybe 15 minutes???? I can't remember now. But the onion takes away the burned flavor.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2004, 11:15 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
carnivore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: the great fly-over
Posts: 291
Ka-Powweee! (that's the sound of carnivore's brain expanding with knowledge. and yes, it's a seasonal event)
thanks, Kelf.
__________________

__________________
carnivore

Wine in a box is better than no wine at all.
carnivore is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fried Rice Claire International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery 12 07-19-2005 03:19 AM
Curry Chicken with Coconut Milk served with Spiced Rice kitchenelf International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery 4 01-02-2005 09:01 AM
Sushi (made with brown rice) kitchenelf International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery 8 09-04-2004 05:02 PM
Spiced Basmati Rice kitchenelf Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 0 11-16-2003 04:04 PM
Perfect rice every time! Andy R Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 12 11-01-2002 04:03 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.