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Old 06-07-2006, 12:52 PM   #11
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One quick note to add to everyone's wonderful tips and recipes is that if for whatever reason you choice to omit the wine, you can simply add more stock (or milk, cream, etc) in place of the wine and the end result will be virtually the same, save perhaps for that mild flavour that it imparts to the dish. I never use alcohol in mine and I'm happy to report that I've not heard any complaints from my Roman husband (and he's the pickest eater I've ever known!).
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Old 06-07-2006, 01:11 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piccolina
One quick note to add to everyone's wonderful tips and recipes is that if for whatever reason you choice to omit the wine, you can simply add more stock (or milk, cream, etc) in place of the wine and the end result will be virtually the same, save perhaps for that mild flavour that it imparts to the dish. I never use alcohol in mine and I'm happy to report that I've not heard any complaints from my Roman husband (and he's the pickest eater I've ever known!).
Thanks Piccolina.........I love wine but don't cook a whole lot with it d/t DH's taste. I figured I could just substitute more stock. Thanks for letting me know I was right with this hunch. Care to share your recipe?
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Old 06-07-2006, 01:27 PM   #13
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I never use wine in my risotto either, always use more broth.
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Old 06-07-2006, 02:27 PM   #14
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Risotto doesn't reheat well. With leftovers, I form the risotto into patties (sometimes formed around mozzy), coat the patties with bread crumbs and pan fry them.
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Old 06-07-2006, 04:30 PM   #15
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Well no Risotto tonight. Unfort., my local grocery store doesn't carry it. I'll have to pick some up when we go do our big shopping.
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Old 06-07-2006, 04:32 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SizzlininIN
Well no Risotto tonight. Unfort., my local grocery store doesn't carry it. I'll have to pick some up when we go do our big shopping.
You might try regular pearl rice. There is a definite texture difference between pearl and arborio and I usually use pearl because I prefer it.
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Old 06-07-2006, 04:36 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by vyapti
You might try regular pearl rice. There is a definite texture difference between pearl and arborio and I usually use pearl because I prefer it.
I didn't even see that. The only thing they had was white, brown and wild rice. I live in a small town and I doubt if most people heard of Risotto around here . I'll check for it when I go to my hometown later this week for our big shopping.
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Old 06-07-2006, 04:59 PM   #18
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If the store that you go to gives you a choice between Carnaroli and Arborio rice, buy the Carnaroli because it gives a better texture in risotto than Arborio. However, Carnaroli is a little more expensive and 90% of the places that sell rice for risotto will only carry Arborio.

Also, keep in mind that Risotto al Milanese is more of a side dish than if you wanted to eat risotto as a meal. You can do what this Italian chef taught me when we had leftover risotto milanese on nights we ran Osso Bucco as a special: eat it with bolognese sauce and lots of fresh grated parmigiano-reggiano.
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Old 06-07-2006, 05:17 PM   #19
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I only use Carnaroli rice for risottos. I love the way the grains turn 'creamy'...
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Old 07-04-2007, 08:54 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
This is one of the classic risottos, Risotto alla Milanese, which also follows the basic technic of risotto making in general.

-1 cup of carnaroli rice (if you can't find it arborio is fine, but carnaroli is the ideal type for making risotto)
-One big onion, finely chopped
-extra virgin olive oil
-1 bayleaf
-half cup of white wine
-500-700ml of hot good quality broth
-1 packet (or just a few strings) of saffran, powdered
-freshly ground parmigiano

In an ample saucepan sautè the onion with plenty of olive oil over middle heat. Add the rice and let the oil coat each morsel of rice well, stirring briskly. When the rice gets semi-transperent add the bayleaf and wine, if necessary raise the heat level, when the wine is almost absorbed (but not burning) start adding the broth one ladleful at a time, adding another ladleful when the previous batch of broth is well absorbed (but the rice should still remain wet), stirring constantly. Repeat the procesure until the rice are cooked "al dente" (firm, not crunchy not mushy)... it should take about somewhere between 20-25minutes more or less, maybe with the electric range it may take a little longer but patiently repeat the procedure in this case, just make sure you prepare enough broth. When it is almost ready, add the saffran to give that wonderful colour and aroma. Cook a few minutes more. Serve hot with plenty of parmigiano to sprinkle upon. The trick to make the wonderful risotto is this "add the broth little by little", instead of letting it cook in the full amount of broth, though it is a little tedious the end result must be tasted to be believed, the each morsel of rice is covered and bursting with its flavour, it is just something else!!



A few easy varieties... add shredded radicchio & carrots or portobello mushrooms when you saute the onions. Follow the rest of the recipe except for the addition of saffran.

Now, this is just a couple of example for a starter... once you get a hang of the making of risotto, you can just run your fancy wild and can do just about anything with the recipe... enjoy the experience!!
I know this post is from a long time ago, but I made this risotto a couple nights ago - Oh my gosh - it is soooooo good! I added mushrooms while sauteing the onions - simply delicious. Thanks!!!!!
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