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Old 01-07-2009, 02:01 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I agree.
I have to go with ChefJune on this one. It's not risotto in the classic sense. I make a lot of risotto because I was raised on it, it requires slow cooking, almost constant stirring, hot broth or other liquid and the right kind of rice.

ME: If you're using the cheapest rice in the supermarket, you aren't making risotto. This dish requires Arborio or Carnaroli rice because it is a different type of rice and will get you that creamy consistancy. The grain is NOT the same as with long or short grain regular rices. The specific risotto rices are NOT cheap so you have to make a decision to make good risotto or make something that isn't the same.

It shouldn't take longer than 30 minutes for the risotto to be done.
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Old 01-07-2009, 02:17 PM   #12
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Don't knock it till you try it. I make a risotto in my rice cooker that does not employ the traditional techniques. There is no stirring or adding of stock a little at a time. I would be wiling to put this risotto up against anybody's traditionally made and I would bet any amount that nobody, but maybe the most discerning chefs possibly would be able to tell the difference. I do not know how or why it works, but it does.
I have never made "Faux Risotto," which is what I call those versions that take any of the various shortcuts. However, I have eaten many of them, made by my friends. While they all taste good, not a single one combines the waviness with the toothsomeness that is achieved in the traditional risotto process. If you are satisfied with the results in the rice cooker, GB, I'm not knocking it at all. It works for YOU.

For me, traditionally made risotto has "something" that no other rice dish has, and when I want that, I am willing to take the time it requires to make it the traditional way.
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Old 01-07-2009, 02:20 PM   #13
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LOL well I do not think I would call mine a shortcut. It takes longer to make my way than it does the traditional way.

I hope someday you are able to taste some risotto like what I am describing June. It will change your mind.
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Old 01-07-2009, 02:23 PM   #14
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LOL well I do not think I would call mine a shortcut. It takes longer to make my way than it does the traditional way.

I hope someday you are able to taste some risotto like what I am describing June. It will change your mind.
Maybe, but I doubt it. I have had "risotto" cooked in a rice cooker several times, and none of them had the texture and consistency I expect in risotto. I'm not quibbling with flavor here.....
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Old 01-07-2009, 02:26 PM   #15
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Well I am glad to see your confidence in me You have never had it made well using that technique, but I have. It can be done.
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Old 01-07-2009, 03:59 PM   #16
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Well I am glad to see your confidence in me You have never had it made well using that technique, but I have. It can be done.
I'm sure you are a good cook, but I have never eaten anything you've made. why should I have "confidence" in your assertion? I have many friends -- yes, some of them are professionals, chefs with restaurants -- who are SURE they can make risotto without going through all the traditional motions. Most of them have satisfied themselves, and that is fine. And their Faux Risotto tastes good. But I can tell the difference.
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Old 01-07-2009, 04:03 PM   #17
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I'm sure you are a good cook, but I have never eaten anything you've made. why should I have "confidence" in your assertion?
Like you said you have never had my cooking so all you have to go on is my word, which you doubted. I just found that a teeniest bit rude, but whatever. No need to take this any further. I do hope that someday you are proved wrong, not so I can say I told you so, but so you can enjoy something a different way than you are used to.
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Old 01-07-2009, 07:24 PM   #18
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GB I think this is the same hummus argument in other clothes. Other spreads with other beans can be made but are not hummus because hummus requires chickpeas. The word means chickpea.

I believe ChefJune is saying the same thing about risotto. It is a particular Italian arborio rice dish prepared in a certain traditional fashion. She is giving you a traditional and proper answer as a trained professional.

You are making a shortcut version of a similar rice dish. It does not mean that it doesn't taste good. She is just saying that part of what makes risotto is the proper technique that results in a creamy product. Further, risotto waits for no one. As it sits it loses its creamy nature especially if cheese is added and can be disappointing for someone who wants to eat the real thing.

I don't believe that ChefJune was meaning to be harsh. I think she was trying to be accurate in her foodie terminology as I was in the other thread.

I hope this helps--I mean to clarify both sides.
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Old 01-07-2009, 07:29 PM   #19
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I do not see it the same as the hummus conversation. If you put hummus next to another spread made out of a different bean then you can pick out which is which without knowing ahead of time. What I am saying is the rice cooker risotto I make is indistinguishable against traditionally made risotto. If you had a bowl of both and did not know ahead of time which was which I would be willing to bet that 999 out of 1000 people would not be able to tell the difference. But like I said before, it really doesn't matter. That is not what this topic is about anyway.
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Old 01-07-2009, 08:57 PM   #20
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I personally prefer to use Carnaroli than Arborio but both work, furthermore, there are others like Vialone Nano which are seldom found here. The reason it is more expensive is because it is being imported and because of supply and demand. Im not sure, but think neither may be grown here in the states. It is a Northern Italian dish and various regions will serve their risottos slightly differently, although the grain should always be served 'al dente' (toothsome), sometimes the final product will be served slightly wetter (for example in Venice where it is served 'all onda' - in the wave) and in other regions slightly more tightly compact and stickier (Piemonte, Lombardia, Emilia-Romagna).

When making risotto, the rice is crucial to the dish. Long grain will not work for two reasons: 1) it does not have the required amount of high-starch or amylose/amylopectin that is needed to reach the proper creaminess that is traditional to the dish and 2) it does not have the required girth of grain in order to absorb a substantial amount of broth/wine to produce the plumpness and will most likely split.

Part of what creates the dish is the MOP or technique. The gradual absorption and evaporation of the hot liquid by the amylose in the grain and the constant stirring allows the individual grains of rice to be rubbed up against each other, thereby exposing and transforming the starch. The idea being that the individual grains not sit there and stew in the liquid, which can lead to a different texture... in the stirring method, whatever liquid cannot be absorbed at the rate the grain is absorbing will thereby evaporate out of the pot. This is why the amount of liquid needed to reach the final product may change every time you make it, because the intensity of heat you are applying as well as the pot you are using, etc. may not always be the same. The idea is that the grain will "call the shots", if you will.
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