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Old 04-10-2019, 06:24 PM   #1
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Rye berries

I was in the store a few weeks ago and came across rye berries .
I assume they are the rye grain in which rye flour is made out of.
Ive never had them before, so figured Id give it a try.
On the back of the package it says it could be used like any other grain ( obviously). Having worked with wheat berries before , I figured Id make some sort of salad from it. I also assumed it would have a unique flavor.

After cooking them up, I tasted them, and they tasted basically the same as wheat berries. Had a unique texture ( kinda chew, hard but soft in a good kinda way ). I wound up making a salad with the ry berries, onion, Greek olives, parsley, lemon juice, walnuts , chopped up stuffed grape leaves , salt and olive oil. Served it as a side to Spinach pie. It came out very good.

Here's the question I have .
I assume rye flour is made from rye berries.
I also assume that rye flour is a main ingredient in rye bread.
I was hoping the flavor would have had some rye bread flavor to it, but it did not at all. I never would have known it was rye.
I know rye bread has the caraway seeds in them, which give it a distinctive flavor.
I also know, the my wife often gets the rye bread with out the caraway seeds, cause the seeds are a little too potent for her.

Question: Where does the rye bread without caraway seeds get its rye bread flavor from, since the rye berries had no distinctive flavor at all ???

just curious.

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Old 04-10-2019, 07:32 PM   #2
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Good question. I often eat Danish style, heavy rye bread, which has no other grains in it and it has a distinctive taste. But, come to think of it, Rye Crisp and similar don't have a particularly strong, distinctly not-wheat flavour. More sort of like wheat, but more so.
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Old 04-10-2019, 07:53 PM   #3
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Larry,

When I was growing up rye bread became my favorite bread, and I always thought that the caraway flavor was rye. Then, one time somebody got a seedless rye, and I thought "Where's the rye flavor!?"

It wasn't until I started baking my own bread that I realized what rye flour was really like. And that most storebought rye is mostly white flour. Actually, most rye bread has mostly wheat, as gluten is needed, unless you make one of those dense, 100% rye breads.

First, I was getting whole grain rye flour, from a co-op I was in, but after that, all I could find was medium rye flour, which was much lighter in color, and flavor, as it has much of the bran and germ removed. Dark rye has a smaller amount of the bran and germ removed, but is much darker, and almost as flavorful as whole rye. The flavor, as you noted, is similar to wheat - you'd have to try them side by side to see the difference. The flavor of rye breads is mostly the seasonings in the bread, plus, in the old northern European bakeries, the sourdough, which was done more out of necessity. In those regions, rye was the only grain that would grow, and the harvested grain would be stored in poor conditions, sprouting some of the grain. This increases the nutrition, but does something to the grain, chemically, making it very unfit for making yeast bread, but the sourdough worked well with it. This is why many classic rye breads are sourdough.

One of two Amish Markets that I used to buy dark rye flour at stopped stocking it - the guy there told me that there just wasn't much demand for it. If the other did the same, I may have to buy a 50 lb bag of rye berries from Honeyville, when they have one of their deals. Then, I'll just grind it as needed. It always seemed strange that the whole berries always cost about twice what the flour did, when the Amish market still carried it.
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Old 04-10-2019, 08:59 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
Larry,

When I was growing up rye bread became my favorite bread, and I always thought that the caraway flavor was rye. Then, one time somebody got a seedless rye, and I thought "Where's the rye flavor!?"

It wasn't until I started baking my own bread that I realized what rye flour was really like. And that most storebought rye is mostly white flour. Actually, most rye bread has mostly wheat, as gluten is needed, unless you make one of those dense, 100% rye breads.

First, I was getting whole grain rye flour, from a co-op I was in, but after that, all I could find was medium rye flour, which was much lighter in color, and flavor, as it has much of the bran and germ removed. Dark rye has a smaller amount of the bran and germ removed, but is much darker, and almost as flavorful as whole rye. The flavor, as you noted, is similar to wheat - you'd have to try them side by side to see the difference. The flavor of rye breads is mostly the seasonings in the bread, plus, in the old northern European bakeries, the sourdough, which was done more out of necessity. In those regions, rye was the only grain that would grow, and the harvested grain would be stored in poor conditions, sprouting some of the grain. This increases the nutrition, but does something to the grain, chemically, making it very unfit for making yeast bread, but the sourdough worked well with it. This is why many classic rye breads are sourdough.

One of two Amish Markets that I used to buy dark rye flour at stopped stocking it - the guy there told me that there just wasn't much demand for it. If the other did the same, I may have to buy a 50 lb bag of rye berries from Honeyville, when they have one of their deals. Then, I'll just grind it as needed. It always seemed strange that the whole berries always cost about twice what the flour did, when the Amish market still carried it.
Thanks for the descriptive reply.
I was just reading a few recipes for seedless rye bread, and as you mentioned, they contain some seasoning elements, including ground caraway seeds. It all makes sense now !! I can chalk this one up as a ' you learn something new every day'. moment.
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Old 04-11-2019, 05:04 AM   #5
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Grass Seeds are not Berries. Wheat, Barley, and Rye, are usually not cooked so much as Pulverised into flour. The Flavor of each grain is lost if you Boil the grain to make salad.


If you Sprout the grain first, then Ferment, they make excelent Beer or Whisky!


Bread? I don't quite understand at all!


Eric, Austin Tx.
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