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Old 03-26-2008, 12:46 AM   #1
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Semolina in Ravioli?

My chef instructor in ITalian cuisine way back in school told us never to use semolina in Ravioli, do any of you follow this practice? and why?

I can only assume its because the two layers of dough would be too tough

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Old 03-26-2008, 01:01 AM   #2
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Semolina makes a dough that is less "sticky" so the two sheets would likely not marry as easily? I suspect homemakers in Italy have been making use of the flour most readily available to them, regardless of culinary school rules, which means at least SOME of them are using their native Semolina, LOL. You may have to wash the inside edges of your sheets to marry it, and be sure to use a pasta wheel or something equally effective to seal those edges.
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Old 03-26-2008, 01:23 AM   #3
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Thanks Amseccia,
well this guy was Italian, but if he told us why not to use it, I sure can't remember.

the only other thing I could think of is that I know Semonlina and Durum flours take on moisture slower, so would make a ravioli more durable in the water.
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Old 03-26-2008, 01:29 AM   #4
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I think that's exactly the reason, they don't take the moisture as readily and if those edges don't seal, your filling is going to muddy up your water (not to mention make stamps of your ravioli). But I do have pasta recipes calling for Semolina, so I think it's just one line of thinking on a VERY broad concept.

I hope you'll let us know how your ravioli turns out. I'm in the mood to make some fresh pasta and my daughter asked tonite as well. Maybe next weekend!
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