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Old 08-21-2011, 02:00 PM   #21
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Poooolenta! I'll surely try your polenta recipe, with some variations, as soon as the temperature drops down... maybe in October!

Thanks for you recipe from the land of the Polentoni
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Old 08-21-2011, 02:08 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post
Poooolenta! I'll surely try your polenta recipe, with some variations, as soon as the temperature drops down... maybe in October!

Thanks for you recipe from the land of the Polentoni
Hope you enjoy it I change the filling sometimes too. I make it with creamed spinach, sometimes I just add tomato to the mushroom and onion mix etc.
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Old 08-25-2011, 11:25 AM   #23
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So I've been thinking about this recipe since Snip posted a pic. Even reading it, it sounds interesting. I do have some questions though.
1. Polenta is not something I usually buy. I know it is another name for cornmeal. Can I use the same cornmeal I use to make cornbread or is it something else I'm looking for? Can grits be substituted?
2. What would be a substitute for the Aromat seasoning?

I know recipes can be tweaked to satisfy tastes and regions but I tend to try to stick pretty close to the original recipe the first time through then adjust to my family preference. I've cooked grits before but not like this and would like to try to make this dish.
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Old 08-25-2011, 11:32 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabbur View Post
So I've been thinking about this recipe since Snip posted a pic. Even reading it, it sounds interesting. I do have some questions though.
1. Polenta is not something I usually buy. I know it is another name for cornmeal. Can I use the same cornmeal I use to make cornbread or is it something else I'm looking for? Can grits be substituted?
2. What would be a substitute for the Aromat seasoning?

I know recipes can be tweaked to satisfy tastes and regions but I tend to try to stick pretty close to the original recipe the first time through then adjust to my family preference. I've cooked grits before but not like this and would like to try to make this dish.
Polenta is usually a coarser grind than corn meal, but cornmeal works, too!
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Old 08-25-2011, 11:35 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabbur View Post
So I've been thinking about this recipe since Snip posted a pic. Even reading it, it sounds interesting. I do have some questions though.
1. Polenta is not something I usually buy. I know it is another name for cornmeal. Can I use the same cornmeal I use to make cornbread or is it something else I'm looking for? Can grits be substituted?
2. What would be a substitute for the Aromat seasoning?

I know recipes can be tweaked to satisfy tastes and regions but I tend to try to stick pretty close to the original recipe the first time through then adjust to my family preference. I've cooked grits before but not like this and would like to try to make this dish.
I would go for a medium ground cornmeal if you want to use that. Not the very finely ground variety. Polenta would be the closest though. White and yellow polenta work well. As long as you cook it to the right consistency. It should set once cooled so it must be soft but hold it's shape.
Aromat is a seasoning salt, I would look it up if I were you and get an idea of which local seasoning salt would be a good substitute. Otherwise just use salt.

Aromat

Hope this helps :)
If you have any more questions just shout!
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Old 08-25-2011, 12:18 PM   #26
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Okay so from the advice here, I'm thinking grits might be closer to polenta than basic corn meal. I can deal with that. Looking at the pics I thought it looked more like grits. Thanks for the tips. If Irene passes us without too much trouble, I'll try this out this weekend using grits and Lawry's seasoned salt in place of the aromat.
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Old 08-25-2011, 12:52 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by jabbur View Post
Okay so from the advice here, I'm thinking grits might be closer to polenta than basic corn meal. I can deal with that. Looking at the pics I thought it looked more like grits. Thanks for the tips. If Irene passes us without too much trouble, I'll try this out this weekend using grits and Lawry's seasoned salt in place of the aromat.
I had a look on Google and Lawry's seasoning salt is as close as you could possibly get to Aromat :)
I will make a note on my side for future recipe posts!
Corn Grits sound like it would be the right thing to use. Pap (what we use) is a ground maize meal made from white corn and sometimes we also use the yellow variety.
As long as you stick to a corn meal that is not superfine it will work in my recipes.
I do try and adjust my recipes according to what is available in America but I
sometimes I'm not sure what is available.

My thoughts are with all of you and praying that no one has too much damage with the storms.
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:08 PM   #28
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Thanks Snip. Polenta is available here but is often more expensive. It has taken on a gourmet aspect here in the US and that means higher prices! I'd have to look for it in the international sections of the grocery! Grits (living in the South) are readily available! Lots of variety. I thought of Lawry's when you called aromat a seasoned salt. Lawry's is a staple in my house and use it in a lot dishes in place of regular salt. About the only place I use regular salt is in baking!

We're getting ready for the storm. Have the gas cans and cars full. Water is getting put up in gallon milk jugs and plastic soda bottles. Some went into the freezer. We'll fill the tub and the wading pool for the dog at the last minute and use those to flush. Got propane tanks for the grill and the camper stove, camping lantern ready. Should do fine. We weathered the direct hit of category 2 hurricane Isabel several years ago just fine so aren't worried now. Thanks for thinking of us.
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:21 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by jabbur View Post
Thanks Snip. Polenta is available here but is often more expensive. It has taken on a gourmet aspect here in the US and that means higher prices! I'd have to look for it in the international sections of the grocery! Grits (living in the South) are readily available! Lots of variety. I thought of Lawry's when you called aromat a seasoned salt. Lawry's is a staple in my house and use it in a lot dishes in place of regular salt. About the only place I use regular salt is in baking!

We're getting ready for the storm. Have the gas cans and cars full. Water is getting put up in gallon milk jugs and plastic soda bottles. Some went into the freezer. We'll fill the tub and the wading pool for the dog at the last minute and use those to flush. Got propane tanks for the grill and the camper stove, camping lantern ready. Should do fine. We weathered the direct hit of category 2 hurricane Isabel several years ago just fine so aren't worried now. Thanks for thinking of us.
Polenta is also readily available here and way more expensive than regular corn meal. I hardly ever buy it since it's pretty much the same thing as our local varieties. I only go for quick cooking polenta to save time when I have the cash to splurge.
I use aromat in all my savoury dishes instead of salt :) I think it's addictive
The ingredients are almost identical to the Lawry's Seasoning you mentioned.
I trust all will be fine with the Hurricane Issues but I will pray for you guys anyway :)
You all seem like such nice people on DC, I would hate for anything bad to happen to any of you!
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Old 09-15-2011, 07:36 PM   #30
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I finally got around to making this tonight to go with our chicken sandwiches. DH likes it. I liked it. The yungun ate it but wasn't thrilled. I think I will halve the recipe the next time I make it since we had over half of the lasagna pan left over! I used less mushrooms and only used them on a third of the pan since I am the only one who likes mushrooms.
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bacon, mushrooms, recipe, white polenta

Snip's Signature Dish I've been thinking long and hard about what my signature dish is and I believe this would be it. We have a traditional Afrikaans dish in SA and this is my version. Very different from the original. I made it for my first husband when we got married the first night we spent together in our home. It's the one side dish that everyone asks me to bring to a braai (BBQ) and family and friends all eat it with their hands otherwise they're not allowed to have any. That's my rule :lol: Both of my children ate this as their first grown up meal and still ask for eat when they want comfort food. Odette's Pap Tert (White polenta bake) White polenta (We use pap in SA but white polenta is the same thing) 1 punnet of portabello mushrooms halved and sliced. 1 large onion thinly sliced 1 cup of cream 1 pound of streaky bacon chopped and fried till crisp. Aromat seasoning and ground black pepper to taste Salt 1 tsp of paprika 1 cup of grated mozzarella 1 cup of grated gouda cheese You'll need one lasagna dish, I use a 30cm x 30cm dish, 6cm deep. On a medium heat fry the onions in butter till translucent, add mushrooms and paprika. Season with Aromat and Black pepper to taste. Fry till mushrooms are fully cooked and set aside till needed. Cook enough polenta to just about fill your lasagna dish, salt and add butter to taste. (The polenta should be the consistancy of mashed potato.) Butter your lasagna dish and spoon half of the cooked polenta into the dish flattening as you go. Spread half of the onion and mushrooms evenly over top and sprinkle with half the crispy bacon and half of both cheeses. Pour half the cream over and spoon remaining polenta on top of this evenly. Add the rest of the onion and mushroom mix, bacon and cream as before, top with remaining cheese. Dust lightly with a bit more paprika. Bake at 350F for 30 mins or until cheese is golden and melted. Serve alongside BBQ'd meats or protein of choice. I wouldn't make this while on a diet :lol: It's very rich but a delicious treat! Knob of butter 3 stars 1 reviews
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