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Old 03-20-2005, 11:48 PM   #11
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Dinner was wonderful - the instructions were beyond compare - but 15 gr of bacon seemed awfully light and 500 gr of pasta for 4 people seemed extremely heavy. I used at least 45 gr of bacon and that wasn't enough for 200 gr of pasta.


Otherwise it was absolutely delightful and my world traveled MIL just it. All of her recipes call for cream which is NOT necessary. I didn't drain the noodles quite enough so there is room for improvement on my part but the flavor was delightful and the sauce was creamy - nearly like a hollandaise!

In future I will double the bacon I used. Aside from that I've no idea how to improve this recipe and DH says it's definately on our Do Again list!

Hugs and Thanks!

2
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Old 03-24-2005, 12:46 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ifitfeelgoodcookit
Annamaria,a word of explanation.Carbonara is the feminine form of carbonare(coal merchants),why?
Hello!
I don't know the origin of Carbonara. I found into an internet site that the Americans soldiers invented it during II world war (!!). Ther used to prepare cooked white pasta with their eggs and bacon.
Carbonara is the feminile of Carbonaro just for grammar. The meanings are different.
Carbonara would be the pasta or the carbonaro's wife! But it's a joke.
Carbonaro would be a coal merchand but most of all is referring to a historical figure: the Carbonari. In italian history books they are a secret political group of people during 1800.
Here is a brief history
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03330c.htm

I forgot to tell. I also add a spoon of panna that is a milk cream for cooking

If I have time I'll write you Pastiera recipe. It's very good! It's an Eater Cake.

Bye.
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Old 07-26-2005, 01:59 PM   #13
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Spaghetti alla carbonare

Hello


I would really like a good recipe of spaghetti alla carbonare. My husband loves italien food (and so do I).

Patricia from Sweden
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Old 07-27-2005, 11:40 AM   #14
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http://www.discusscooking.com/forum....php/t-668.html

Try this one.
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Old 07-27-2005, 01:16 PM   #15
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Can't wait to try this one...

I can't wait to try this recipe! I printed it yesterday, but it was too hot to cook. Looking at the thread today, I see the advise about the bacon quantity, which I will take into consideration. Thanks! Sandyj
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Old 07-27-2005, 02:58 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annamaria
Hello!
I don't know the origin of Carbonara. I found into an internet site that the Americans soldiers invented it during II world war (!!). Ther used to prepare cooked white pasta with their eggs and bacon.
Carbonara is the feminile of Carbonaro just for grammar. The meanings are different.
Carbonara would be the pasta or the carbonaro's wife! But it's a joke.
Carbonaro would be a coal merchand but most of all is referring to a historical figure: the Carbonari. In italian history books they are a secret political group of people during 1800.
Here is a brief history
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03330c.htm

I forgot to tell. I also add a spoon of panna that is a milk cream for cooking

If I have time I'll write you Pastiera recipe. It's very good! It's an Eater Cake.

Bye.
The wives of the coal workers would make this pasta when their husbands came home from work. The pepper flecks were supposed to resemble the coals.
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Old 07-27-2005, 05:22 PM   #17
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this is a great recipe, and really reflects the Italian ballance of meat to sauce to pasta.
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