"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-05-2010, 01:17 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: San Diego
Posts: 10
Spaghetti Carbonara with Homemade Bacon

The cuisine of most countries is often associated with a certain style/focus, like French cuisine is mostly linked to elaborate, complex dishes, German to heavily meat based dishes with hardly any vegetables besides potatoes or Italian to simple dishes with few ingredients. Most of these generalizations are based on stereotypes and don’t even take into account that most countries have many diverse regional cuisines. But even though you have to take these stereotypes with a grain of salt they still have some relevance often related to some of the most well known dishes of a cuisine. Many risottos and pasta dishes in Italy for example tend to focus on the quality of one or two main ingredients. One of the best known pasta dishes falling under this category is Spaghetti Carbonara – just pasta, pancetta/guanciale, eggs and Parmigiano-Reggiano define this dish.
The origin of Spaghetti Carbonara is quite controversial. It seems that most people can agree that the dish originated at the end of the Second World War somewhere in the area of Lazio. Everything beyond this – does the name (carbonara means charcoal in Italy) come from a restaurant name carbonara or was this dish popular with charcoal workers – is still part of many discussions.

Since we recently started to dive into the world of charcuterie, and our first successful attempt was a nice homemade bacon, we decided to deviate a little bit from the classical use of pancetta/guanciale and were very happy with the results.

Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat and add bacon and ½ tsp. black pepper. Cook bacon for about 5 minutes until it starts to crisp.

Add onion and cook for 5 minutes until onions are soft. At the same time cook pasta until al dente. Reserve a ¼ cup of the cooking water and drain the spaghetti. Beat the eggs until smooth and set aside.

Remove pan from heat and add 1-2 tbsp water and scrape brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Heat pan to medium heat and add pasta to pan. Toss pasta to coat the spaghetti with the fat for about a minute. Make sure that the pasta doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. If the pasta is too dry and starts sticking to the bottom add 1-2 tbsp of pasta water.

Remove skillet from heat and add eggs to the pasta and start immediately tossing pasta for about a minute until eggs thicken and sauce has the consistency of a thin custard. Season with black pepper.


Recipe adapted from “Fine Cooking”

Serves 2

1 tbsp olive oil
220 g (½ lb) bacon, sliced ¼ inch thick and cut into 1 ½ x ½ inch rectangles
½ small red onion, finely diced
2 large eggs, chilled
220 g (1/2 lb) dried spaghetti
35 g (1.5 oz) finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

__________________

__________________
twofoodiesonejourney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2010, 10:12 AM   #2
Flour Child
 
mollyanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,406
That sounds delicious but I feel like it needs something like herbs or chopped spinach or parsley or tomatoes...is that ever done with this dish?
__________________

__________________


. My kitchen is for dancing. Bring me sunshine in a cup~emily dickinson. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
mollyanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2010, 10:15 AM   #3
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Mollyanne, if its done right it needs nothing else. Spaghetti carbonara is a very traditional dish and no herbs are used. Just the bacon, eggs, cheese and pasta. Its history suggests it was a breakfast dish, but its good any time of day.

Use quality ingredients and give it a go. You'll love it.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2010, 02:03 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
qmax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Puget Sound convergence zone
Posts: 997
Quote:
Originally Posted by twofoodiesonejourney View Post
The cuisine of most countries is often associated with a certain style/focus, like French cuisine is mostly linked to elaborate, complex dishes, German to heavily meat based dishes with hardly any vegetables besides potatoes or Italian to simple dishes with few ingredients. Most of these generalizations are based on stereotypes and don’t even take into account that most countries have many diverse regional cuisines. But even though you have to take these stereotypes with a grain of salt they still have some relevance often related to some of the most well known dishes of a cuisine. Many risottos and pasta dishes in Italy for example tend to focus on the quality of one or two main ingredients. One of the best known pasta dishes falling under this category is Spaghetti Carbonara – just pasta, pancetta/guanciale, eggs and Parmigiano-Reggiano define this dish.
The origin of Spaghetti Carbonara is quite controversial. It seems that most people can agree that the dish originated at the end of the Second World War somewhere in the area of Lazio. Everything beyond this – does the name (carbonara means charcoal in Italy) come from a restaurant name carbonara or was this dish popular with charcoal workers – is still part of many discussions.

Since we recently started to dive into the world of charcuterie, and our first successful attempt was a nice homemade bacon, we decided to deviate a little bit from the classical use of pancetta/guanciale and were very happy with the results.

Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat and add bacon and ½ tsp. black pepper. Cook bacon for about 5 minutes until it starts to crisp.

Add onion and cook for 5 minutes until onions are soft. At the same time cook pasta until al dente. Reserve a ¼ cup of the cooking water and drain the spaghetti. Beat the eggs until smooth and set aside.

Remove pan from heat and add 1-2 tbsp water and scrape brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Heat pan to medium heat and add pasta to pan. Toss pasta to coat the spaghetti with the fat for about a minute. Make sure that the pasta doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. If the pasta is too dry and starts sticking to the bottom add 1-2 tbsp of pasta water.

Remove skillet from heat and add eggs to the pasta and start immediately tossing pasta for about a minute until eggs thicken and sauce has the consistency of a thin custard. Season with black pepper.


Recipe adapted from “Fine Cooking”

Serves 2

1 tbsp olive oil
220 g (½ lb) bacon, sliced ¼ inch thick and cut into 1 ½ x ½ inch rectangles
½ small red onion, finely diced
2 large eggs, chilled
220 g (1/2 lb) dried spaghetti
35 g (1.5 oz) finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
Pretty much the way I like it.

Somewhere along the way, cream became a common ingredient, but I suspect this is sort of an American adaptation. I like it better without the cream.

I also think guanciale takes it to the next level, but that can be a tough ingredient to find, and not particularly inexpensive in the US.
__________________
qmax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2010, 07:50 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: San Diego
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mollyanne View Post
That sounds delicious but I feel like it needs something like herbs or chopped spinach or parsley or tomatoes...is that ever done with this dish?

There are of course many different variations which include spinach, mushrooms etc. but if you want to be authentic and really focus on the quality of the ingredients it is only pasta, bacon/guanciale, egg and Parmigiano-Reggiano.
__________________
Cooking, Eating and Traveling: http://twofoodiesonejourney.blogspot.com
twofoodiesonejourney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2010, 08:07 PM   #6
Flour Child
 
mollyanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,406
...sounds delish. I'll try it the authentic way. I can always do a side of spinach. Thank you, twofoodies, for the idea.
(i should have made my username "twofooties" )
__________________

__________________


. My kitchen is for dancing. Bring me sunshine in a cup~emily dickinson. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
mollyanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.