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Old 07-21-2008, 10:14 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Is cooking the pasta that big of a deal that you have to settle for chewy and rubbery shells?
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I think unless your shells are totally immersed in sauce with enough liquid for them to absorb I don't see it working.
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Another drawback of using uncooked shells...
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They're still cooking

I'm curious too - how did they turn out???
like school lunch, I imagine, dry on top, crusty around the rim, rubbery throughout, but a good jaw workout.

just my $.02
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Old 07-21-2008, 10:19 PM   #12
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They're still cooking
(just so you know, I just went to post the below, and the screen cleared, took me to the top of page, where the welcome, quicksilver is on the right, and quicksilver
flashed red, then back to blue, then back here again to post)
Anyway, K.e

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Old 07-21-2008, 11:20 PM   #13
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I’ve done this a few times with great results. I use Rigatoni shells which are A LOT easier to stuff when they are hard and uncooked. All I’ve had to do is add an extra 1 to 1.5 cups of water, cover, and bake. For example, the last time I did this, I stuffed the “raw” shells with a cheese mixture, layered them in a pan, and added a tomato sauce with an extra 1 cup of water. Covered and baked and it turned out phenomenal. Perfect.

The key is, like cooking rice, to add extra water to your recipe to account for cooking the dry pasta. It’s worked for me several times with no chewy pasta and no burnt ends. Just make sure your pasta is completely submerged, you add some extra water, and you keep it covered for baking. It works like a charm and is so much easier to stuff Rigatoni than trying to fill it after it is cooked and limp.
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Old 07-21-2008, 11:26 PM   #14
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Rigatoni makes sense and those shells would be immersed. I've never made stuffed shells where the shells were completely immersed. I really hope they turned out - I'm sure there would be a way to recover if they didn't - hopefully!
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Old 07-21-2008, 11:37 PM   #15
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For a large shell like conchiglioni, Iím not sure what would happen, but with rigatoni, a smaller shell that is easily submersed, it works great. Then again, a shell like conchiglioni can be easily stuffed after it is cooked.

Also, they are making the ďbakeĒ noodles these days where you just add dry noodles, extra water, and then bake. Itís rather popular for lasagna.
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Old 07-22-2008, 12:10 AM   #16
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I tried the lasagna noodles (the no cooking first) one time - didn't like them at all!
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Old 07-22-2008, 12:13 AM   #17
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A bit chewy huh? That's what I thought.

It seems the regular noodles do better than the "bake" noodles if you put them in the right environment with proper liquid. Kind of like rice and baking.
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Old 07-22-2008, 12:18 AM   #18
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Let's just say the texture sure was "off"
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Old 07-22-2008, 12:20 AM   #19
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We goofed once when I was making lasagna and got the "bake" noodles. I wasn't up to speed on adjusting the new recipe (first time making lasgana) and the noodles were definitely a bit "off". DW said it was good, but I know the noodles were the downfall of that dish!

Edited to add: Ok, I'll be honest, something went wrong and the noodles were really bad!!!
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Old 07-22-2008, 08:03 AM   #20
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I still don't get it. All this is to avoid boiling water?
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