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Old 07-11-2016, 03:10 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
Thanks for the post. I found a couple of videos on YouTube that clarify this for those of us who have never made pasta by hand:

I have a Simac electric pasta machine (extrusion type) that I haven't used since the last millennium, and even then it was just a few times. Now that I'm fully retired and have time for such frivolities I'm planning to make pasta. The tagliatelle looks easy enough, and I can make it without a hand crank pasta machine. The store bought tagliatelle is in much longer strips - probably 20 inches or so.

Will all purpose flour make acceptable pasta? I try to avoid buying special purpose ingredients, but if it works out I'll hunt for the flour called for. I already have three types of flour on hand (AP, bread, and rye).

I'll be interested in your water based pasta recipes.
I have always used AP flour. If I remember to buy it, I mix it with a little semolina. But I don't think it is an absolute necessity. AP will make a perfectly tasty pasta. But I do think you have to knead it a bit longer than if you added some semolina flour. You need to develop the gluten more than if you had the semolina added. Since you have bread flour, you might make a small batch with that. Bread flour has more gluten than the AP does.
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Old 07-11-2016, 03:45 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I have always used AP flour. If I remember to buy it, I mix it with a little semolina. But I don't think it is an absolute necessity. AP will make a perfectly tasty pasta. But I do think you have to knead it a bit longer than if you added some semolina flour. You need to develop the gluten more than if you had the semolina added. Since you have bread flour, you might make a small batch with that. Bread flour has more gluten than the AP does.
Technically speaking, bread flour has more protein, not more gluten. But when the protein is activated by moisture and kneading, more gluten is developed, giving it more structure.
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:17 PM   #13
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Tagliatelle with Asparagus

It's been a few days since I last contributed to the Forum, but here, on request, is the recipe for water pasta. This comes from an area of Italy called Lucania, whose main city is Potenza, south east of Rome and notorious for the danger of earthquakes. Generally speaking, water based pastas are used more in southern Italy than they are in the north, where the fresh pasta tends to be egg pasta in ribbons and filled pasta such as ravioli and cappelletti. There seems to be a preference in the south for water pasta in short and small shapes, and spaghetti 'alla chitarra' (guitar) cut on a rectangular frame with strings that bears a kind of resemblance to the musical instrument. The pasta is rolled into sheets which are then placed on top and are pushed through the strands leaving the spaghetti on the bottom.
Sophia Loren, who was an amazing cook, and wrote several very knowledgeable cookery books, famously said 'Making pasta made me the woman I am'. Anyway, back to making the water pasta:

330gr. strong flour (durum wheat), or the contents of three fistfuls of of flour.
170g tepid water
salt
NO OIL

Make a volcano and crater with the salted flour. Add the water a bit at a time, drawing in the flour as you go. When the water is incorporated, draw in the rest of the remaining flour and start kneading. Knead until you get a smooth ball of dough. Rest the dough for 30 mins, and you have a rest as well. Then start shaping the pasta into whatever shapes you like.

A couple of suggestions:

Orecchiette: take a ball of pasta about the size of a fist, and hand roll it into a sausage about 1.5cm thick. Cut into sections about 75mm thick, then press each ball over your middle finger to make a little bowl. Leave to dry a little more, or until you're ready to cook them. They cook in about 30 - 45 secs.

Strascinati: (pronounced 'strashinarty')
A great tradition in southern Italy, because they are designed to hold a fair amount of sauce, usually rag¨:
This time, make sausage shapes about the size of your thumb. Then, using your index finger, middle finger and ring finger, make indentations in the pasta and pull your fingers towards you, leaving a thick edge. You could call them knuckledusters! as it were.
These are always served with a meat rag¨, made with the cheapest cuts of lamb, pork and veal, and chilli pepper sausage called 'pezzente'.

Strangolapreti (Priest stranglers - one wonders at times where on earth these names appeared from!)
Very easy. make squares of pasta about 5mm thick, and roll them up corner to corner.

Being fresh, these pastas cook very quickly, so once they're in the pan, don't leave them.

Have fun!! Buon appetito!

di reston

Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
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Old 07-12-2016, 03:03 PM   #14
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Thanks, Di. I knew that there were different shapes of pasta for different dishes, but didn't realize there are regional differences as well.
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Old 07-13-2016, 05:15 AM   #15
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Thanks. I grew up being exposed to only the egg based pasta. I knew there was a water based one, but whenever I asked about it, I got the remark that those folks didn't know how to make real pasta. Regional jealousy I guess.
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Old 08-24-2016, 07:24 AM   #16
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Sounds delicious!
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asparagus, recipe, tips

Tagliatelle with asparagus tips Today I did tagliatelle with fresh asparagus tips (recipe given t0 me by a friend). Delicious! Here it is: For the pasta: (per portion) 100g flour, 50g '00' flour and 50g durum wheat flour - 1 egg per portion (for ravioli etc, it's '0' flour, or strong durum wheat flour) 1 egg salt. In Piedmont, the recipe tends to be richer: 1kg type 00 flour + 5 whole eggs + 10 egg yolks, therefore per person 1/2 whole egg + 2 egg yolks. Another, less tricky recipe would be 1Kg type 00 flour, 2 egg yolks and 8 eggs (Quantities for 10 people) salt. Sift the flour onto a large pasta board ,making a volcano shape and then make a crater in it and put in the eggs, which you should previously have stirred well but not vigourously. Work it until it's soft and smooth. Every now and again, slap it down onto the board a few times, work it again, let it rest it for about 1/2 hour. By then it should be elastic and workable. Roll out on the pasta board (a large wooden board called a 'spianatoia',flouring lightly so it doesn't stick, and then roll it out until it's about 2ml thick. Then flour it very very lightly again, and roll up into a cylinder. Cut the cylinder into slices about 5mm wide, and then pick them up to loosen the strands and let them dry a little. The rest is easy: For 5 people: 100g fresh egg pasta per person 500g fresh asparagus tips 30cl fresh cream 50g butter 50g parmesan cheese, grated fresh thyme to taste Salt and a good dusting of fresh ground black pepper. Bring the necessary quantity of salted water to the boil SautÚ the asparagus tips in the butter, then add the cream. Season. When the water comes to the boil, cook the tagliatelle (it will cook very very quickly, so keep an eye on it), then drain and add to the tips and the butter and cream. Just before serving toss the Parmesan in, and serve. Buon appetito. I make my own tagliatelle for this, but shop bought dried ones work quite well if you don't have time.:yum: di reston Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde 3 stars 1 reviews
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