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Old 06-11-2017, 09:24 PM   #11
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Sorry for responding to this thread so late. I've been away.
Never made polenta. Have made grits, a porridge from whole grain or nixtamalized ground corn a few times a week for decades though. Never owned, or even seen a large heavy copper pot, except for in an uncle's still. Made mine for years in a regular heavy pot and hovered over it stirring to prevent scorching. A few years ago, don't remember the inspiration, started putting a stainless steel mixing bowl atop the pot and cooking the grits polenta in that. With this method, I can start the coffee and the grits and take a shower while they cook. If it is a real course grain they may take 30 - 40 minutes but you can let them go for twice that if it's convenient.

Americans (Yankees mostly) will say grits are bland. Well, maybe, but if so, it is the cook's fault. His job is to decide how to pair them based on the rest of the meal. Common adds are eggs, sausage, garlic, onion, various peppers or chiles, cheeses, shrimp, crayfish, dried meats, etc., ad infimum.

Then there are the "corn mush" traditions. My Pennsyltucky parents would put the cornmeal mush aside and fry it up for dessert with maple syrup. Italian neighbors would do something similar but with tomato sauce and such.
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:43 AM   #12
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This the polenta grits I've been using for a few years.
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:51 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
"Maize Flour" to me means corn flour, which is not what you make polenta with ....
In South Africa maize meal is the same as Polenta and corn flour is used for thickening sauces. Different all over the world so it gets confusing.
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:57 AM   #14
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Thank you for posting. I absolutely love polenta. We use mainly white maize meal in SA and the more popular yellow has all but vanished off supermarket shelves. Polenta is exactly the same as the yellow corn meal I grew up on. Was thrilled when I discovered it. Your method is also very much the same as the South African way of making it.
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Old 06-12-2017, 12:07 PM   #15
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Skiletlicker, your photo shows exactly what the quality, gritty polenta grits are like in Italy. Very interesting threads. Personally, I've always found that the gritty type of polenta flour is much better than anything else, and the more 'convenience' type doesn't give anything like as good a result. Loved reading your posts!

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Old 06-12-2017, 12:28 PM   #16
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The most common grits on the shelf where I shop is white hominy, nixtamalized corn, dried and coarsely ground. It doesn't have as much flavor as the yellow corn grits do.

I keep stone ground corn meal too but that's for cornbread and corncakes (corn pancakes). Also, have masa harina on hand.

By the way, in the first post didn't mention filling the heavy pot with water before putting the mixing bowl on top. I'm sure you all recognized it as just a poor man's double boiler.
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