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Old 11-09-2005, 11:27 AM   #1
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Thumbs up TNT: Boursin and Leek Risotto

A total TNT! Which I'd been meaning to post for urmaniac13 (thanks for the quark tips!) and of course everyone else too

This satisfying risotto does not require white wine as most call for (you can always omit it and up the stock, cream, or water level to suffice), nor does it require the labour intensive work of many of its risotto counterparts.

Delicious as a starting course, along side poultry or fish, or simply as the main dish this is certainly one risotto you’ll be happy to make time and time again.

Boursin and Leek Risotto

1 ½ cups risotto rice

4 tbsp good quality olive oil

4 ½ cups of hot chicken or vegetable stock (organic or homemade if possible)

¾ cup Boursin cheese

2-3 leek stalks, washed and thinly sliced into circles

2 tbsp fresh parsley thinly chopped

Salt and pepper to taste (optional)

Directions

In a large pot bring the stock just to a slow boil, and reduce the heat just enough to cease the boiling but keep the stock warm.

In a heavy bottomed pan heat the olive oil and the leeks for about 2 minutes over medium heat. You want the leeks to take on a bright green shade but not to wilt too much.

To the pan add the rice and cook for about 3 minutes stirring continually so that the rice does not burn but instead take on a nice golden sheen.

Add all the rice and leek mixture to the stock and return the pot to a boil. Cover and simmer over low heat for about 15 minutes. Do not stir during this time.

After 15 minutes check to see how tender your rice is. If it is tender enough for your taste, remove the pan from the heat and stir in the salt & pepper, fresh parsley, and the boursin cheese. Stir until the cheese begins to melt and all the flavours are combined. Serve at once.

Serves 4-6 people

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Old 11-09-2005, 11:33 AM   #2
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Sounds yummy!!!
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Old 11-09-2005, 11:43 AM   #3
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Yumm!! I am always on the look out for a new variety to make risotto, this sounds like a winner!!

One suggestion though, if and when you have the time for it, try adding the broth little by little, like one big ladle at a time, and keep on adding another batch as the last one gets absorbed enough (but not too dry). Make sure to keep the broth hot, and cook it uncovered until the rice attains the desired consistency (al dente). A bit more tedious as it requires frequent stirring, but the end result you can really taste it... this way the flavour really wraps around the each morsel of rice.

Also a piece of bayleaf as it gets cooked add a nice aroma to the risotto!
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Old 11-09-2005, 02:23 PM   #4
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mmmmmm, this looks really good - we're having guests for dinner on Friday, and my husband's making a special South African stew in an iron pot (that looks like a witches cauldron) over the fire (called "potjie", pronounced poi-kie). I think your rice dish might make a perfect accompanyment. Thanks!

I have two questions - maybe for another forum:
How do you know if the olive oil you're using is "good" quality? That's sure to have a lot of opinions - no need to answer here - I was just musing.

What does boursin cheese taste like? Nutty? Creamy? What would be a good substitute if it couldn't be obtained?
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Old 11-09-2005, 04:56 PM   #5
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Boursin is traditionally a spread for bread or crackers. It's really tasty stuff. It has a soft, cream cheese consistancy with some nice subtle herbs mixed in.

There is a huge spread of the kinds of EVOO out there, just as there are wines. One thing to look for in a quality EVOO is to make sure it's cold pressed and first press; it should have a nice color and aroma. I usually spend about $12 to $15 on a decent bottle which I save for using in dishes like this or for making vinegrettes and such (where the flavor of the oil has a huge impact on the end result). I use cheaper brands for everything else. Of course money isn't the only factor in finding a yummy olive oil so really it's something that you just have to experiment with to find one that you love.


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Old 11-09-2005, 11:43 PM   #6
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This is a sure hit! I love leeks and I love rissotto! Thanks for posting this - it's now on the weekend menu!
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Old 11-10-2005, 03:11 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandyj
How do you know if the olive oil you're using is "good" quality? That's sure to have a lot of opinions - no need to answer here - I was just musing.
One helpful sign to tell the quality of the oil is from the container it comes in. Because the oil's producers have no way in knowing how long their product may sit on a shelf, the better olive oils come in a darker colored or even opaque container to minimize the amount of light that the oil is exposed to. Excessive amounts of light can cause photooxidation which will make the oil go rancid faster. Olive oil packed in clear glass or plastic containers can go rancid up to 60% faster than oils which are packed and stored properly.
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Old 11-10-2005, 03:15 AM   #8
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Also, Olive Oils from different countries have different flavors as well. I prefer Spanish Olive Oil myself.
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Old 11-10-2005, 05:33 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lindatooo
This is a sure hit! I love leeks and I love rissotto! Thanks for posting this - it's now on the weekend menu!
Your very welcome, let us know what you think of it (You can add a little parm to it, or serve it with parmesan at the table if you like.)
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Old 11-10-2005, 06:53 AM   #10
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Sandyj - here's the Boursin site. I've always got the fines herbes and plain varieties in my fridge!

http://www.boursincheese.com/about/facts.htm
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