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Old 07-25-2011, 01:08 PM   #1
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TNT: Lime & Cilantro Rice

Love this stuff! I use it in burritos, under spicy beans or grilled chicken.

2 T butter
1 1/2 c basmati / jasmine rice
2 1/2 c chicken or vegetable stock
1 lime, zested and juiced
cilantro

I do this all in my rice cooker, but it works just as well in a regular pan.

Melt the butter. Add the rice and lime juice and zest. Stir frequently until the rice becomes toasted and changes color to a light, toasty roasty tan color. Add the stock, give it a stir and cook until the rice is done.

Fluff the rice with a fork. Stir in a heap of cilantro. Devour!
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Old 07-25-2011, 04:23 PM   #2
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Sounds good. I will use coriander seeds instead of coriander or maybe parsley. Don't enjoy coriander leaves. It's a love it or hate it herb!
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:44 AM   #3
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FWIW, the seeds are coriander, the fresh leaves are cilantro. I don't remember why, but I do remember that clarification from the mail bag on America's Test Kitchen.
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:37 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
FWIW, the seeds are coriander, the fresh leaves are cilantro. I don't remember why, but I do remember that clarification from the mail bag on America's Test Kitchen.
FWI
Its not called cilantro anywhere in Africa, it's coriander leaves and seeds.
Americans call the leaves cilantro and the seeds coriander.
But since the plants botanical name is Coriandrum Sativum I will stick to what we call it here.
Cilantro comes from the Spanish name for Coriander but technically calling any part of the plant coriander is correct.
So I guess either Cilantro or Coriander would be acceptable.
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Old 07-26-2011, 10:35 AM   #5
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Ciantro is the Spanish word for before the plant flowers and produces seeds. That is considered the first stage of the growth of the plant a nd yes, that is it's biological name. Corriander refers to the seeds. So it would appear that cilantro is a loanword from Spanish but has lost some of its distinct meaning through common usage by English-speaking people (coriander, on the other hand, has had its meaning/understanding of the term extended).
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Old 07-26-2011, 10:56 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Ciantro is the Spanish word for before the plant flowers and produces seeds. That is considered the first stage of the growth of the plant a nd yes, that is it's biological name. Corriander refers to the seeds. So it would appear that cilantro is a loanword from Spanish but has lost some of its distinct meaning through common usage by English-speaking people (coriander, on the other hand, has had its meaning/understanding of the term extended).
Cilantro is a word borrowed from Spanish and coriander from French, some countries use one and some the other. There have been many a debate about the subject but both are right.
We say Coriander you say Cilantro so lets call the whole thing off!
We say tomato sauce, you say ketchup etc etc etc.
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:00 AM   #7
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Cilantro-Coriander...

I didn't know any of that! Wonderful information.

Thanks to both of you!

You've helped make my head be something besides a hat-rack!
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:05 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
Cilantro-Coriander...

I didn't know any of that! Wonderful information.

Thanks to both of you!

You've helped make my head be something besides a hat-rack!
lol! Thanks Timothy :)
Did go and do some research but I admit I started falling asleep half way through! What a debacle over a darn name.
I say lets meet in the middle and call it Chinese parsley (yet another name it's known by)
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TNT: Lime & Cilantro Rice Love this stuff! I use it in burritos, under spicy beans or grilled chicken. 2 T butter 1 1/2 c basmati / jasmine rice 2 1/2 c chicken or vegetable stock 1 lime, zested and juiced cilantro I do this all in my rice cooker, but it works just as well in a regular pan. Melt the butter. Add the rice and lime juice and zest. Stir frequently until the rice becomes toasted and changes color to a light, toasty roasty tan color. Add the stock, give it a stir and cook until the rice is done. Fluff the rice with a fork. Stir in a heap of cilantro. Devour! 3 stars 1 reviews
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