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Old 01-07-2014, 02:28 PM   #11
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Most commercially, mass produced tomatoes are horrible, no matter the time of year. I prefer canned tomatoes for making sauce or Sunday gravy.
Some of our best professional chefs recommend that you use canned tomatoes. They go right from the field after picking to the cannery which is located right next to the field of tomatoes. They are in the can within two hours of being picked. Unless you are using tomatoes from your own garden, the ones in the store have travelled many mile to get to your store. And then they are sitting in the back room until the employees get them out for display and purchase. You can hardly call them fresh.
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Old 01-07-2014, 02:44 PM   #12
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Unless they come from my garden they come from a can
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Old 01-07-2014, 02:52 PM   #13
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I find that organic tomatoes usually have plenty of flavour, even in winter.
Okay. I must try them now. I know I pay over $3.00 a lb for non organic. I bet the organic ones are pricey?

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Unless they come from my garden they come from a can
Lucky me. I live in the country and all my neighbors have gardens in the summer. We get many more tomatoes than we need.
I have no desire to can either.
This is one reason I have turned to container gardening and growing some herbs. No one around here grows herbs. (I did say herbs, not herb) So it works out well.

Winter still sucks!!!!!
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Old 01-07-2014, 02:53 PM   #14
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I'm going to grow some tomatoes this year in the garden. What's the best variety for sauces? Roma?
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Old 01-07-2014, 03:22 PM   #15
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I'm going to grow some tomatoes this year in the garden. What's the best variety for sauces? Roma?
Yup, but they have to be grown in the soil and climate of San Marzano, Italy.
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Old 01-07-2014, 03:58 PM   #16
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I'm going to grow some tomatoes this year in the garden. What's the best variety for sauces? Roma?
The regular toms haven't been the best here as far as my homegrowns have gone, but I've had fantastic success with growing Sweet 100 cherry tomatoes. My gravy, those plants are prolific. I still have some I picked green that continue to ripen. I use Ina Garten's recipe for roasted cherry toms, freeze a bunch after roasting, and they have made wonderful sauce. You can whizz them with the boat motor, add other herbs and such. Romas are good for sauces and dehydrating, but I love my little cherry toms, they're so multipurpose.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/i...ipe/index.html
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Old 01-07-2014, 03:59 PM   #17
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Yup, but they have to be grown in the soil and climate of San Marzano, Italy.
Gotta say, I think that's just silly. I've been growing my own tomatoes for 20 years and they taste great. Sometimes I just peel and chop them and sometimes I roast, then peel and chop them, then portion them into the freezer for winter use. They taste fresh and delicious. I'm bummed I'm out
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Old 01-07-2014, 04:13 PM   #18
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>>What's the best variety for sauces? Roma?
Roma is often used because it has less "water" than typical varieties - making it easier/faster to "reduce" for sauces.

but - and there's always one of those . . . you may find Romas are not the really best tasting.
it's a personal thing.
rather a lot of the older heirloom / open pollinated varieties excel in the taste department, at least around here.

I garden my own tomatoes; then in batches I cook them down to 'stewed tomato" consistency and freeze. sometimes with onion and green pepper, sometimes not.

doing homemade pizza with previously not salted, not chemically preserved, not processed to dust.... tomatoes is something you need to experience to appreciate. I defrost the "stewed tomato" and reduce it further for pizza sauce.

buying tomatoes at grocery store prices for homemade sauce is seriously not 'economical' - you'll need 10-12 pounds of tomatoes to produce perhaps two quarts of sauce.

if you have access to direct farmer-to-customer stands, ask / look for "canners" - these are the same tomatoes as the A-Number-One stuff - with blemishes / mishapes that render them unappealing for the fresh table market. If I run short of my own garden produce, I get canners, late in the season, for $2 per bushel. there is more "waste" - but the price more than makes up for it and you get some compost in the bargin.

for off season fresh tomatoes I go with two options:
- as mentioned - Romas. in the season of wooden tomatoes, Romas will be better than the average "whatever" they're calling tomatoes.
- the "on a cluster stem" varieties - usually out of Canadian hot houses. a reasonable facsimile to a real tomato.
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Old 01-07-2014, 05:13 PM   #19
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Gotta say, I think that's just silly.
As it was meant to be, a joke. Sheesh.
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Old 01-07-2014, 05:34 PM   #20
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As it was meant to be, a joke. Sheesh.
I caught the wink!
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recipe, sauce, sauces, tomato, tomatoes

Tomato sauces Hi guys. I'm Italian and I want give you some sauces's recipes for pasta. Today I would post the tomato sauce. Before write the recipes about this sauce I point out that there are many recipes but it depends what you want to eat. For examples I like so much the sauce with the fresh tomatoes. My favorite sauce is this. Ingredients: - some tomatoes (it's ok all type but not those for salad) - one garlic clove - some basil leaf - salt. First, let's wash the tomatoes and cut them in more pieces. After, take a nonstick pan and put in it one spoon of olive oil (better if it's extra virgin). Press with a fork the garlic keeping his peel and put in the pan. Fry it at over low heat for few minute. Take out the garlic and put the tomatoes in the pan. Cooking all of it at over low heat for about fifteen minutes. In the same time add salt and the fresh basil cut with hands. When the tomatoes are a little bit reduced to a soft pulp (but not liquefied), the sauce is ready. If you want add a little bit of sugar (a quarter of teaspoon). This make the sauce less sour. This pasta is very good with some differents pasta types. Apart from classic spaghetti you can try this sauce with thin spaghetti (spaghettini), linguine and mezze penne. Naturally you have to cook the pasta "al dente", put it in the pan with the sauce then pan-fry for about three minute. Buon appetito 3 stars 1 reviews
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