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Old 07-13-2009, 06:28 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Wyogal View Post
How about sushi rice? I was taught to wash it well. A friend who has a Japanese grandmother was very familiar with the process, it was the job she did when helping her grandma. It wasn't just rinsed quickly, but washed, rubbing the grains lightly between the palms of one's hands, until the water runs clear.
Sushi rice is a different category. It's not a long grain rice like what has been discussed.

Thoroughly washing sushi rice, as you described, is essential to the final product.
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Old 07-13-2009, 06:29 PM   #12
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thanks, that's what I thought. Just wanted to be sure! : )
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Old 07-13-2009, 08:33 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Wyogal View Post
How about sushi rice? I was taught to wash it well. A friend who has a Japanese grandmother was very familiar with the process, it was the job she did when helping her grandma. It wasn't just rinsed quickly, but washed, rubbing the grains lightly between the palms of one's hands, until the water runs clear.
I'm pretty certain that goes back to the old practice of adding talc to the raw rice, and it's not really necessary otherwise -- except the Japanese go nuts when it comes to rice and tradition! Nonetheless, see this page:

The Sushi FAQ - How to Make Sushi Rice at Home

In particular, this paragraph:
It is best to use the instructions on the package of rice when cooking it, but a general suggestion is to use equal parts rice and water. Prior to cooking, the rice should be rinsed in cold water until the water runs clear, a step now becoming less necessary as talc (used to prevent the rice from absorbing water and sticking together during storage) is slowly being replaced with another type of starch, which is fine to cook with. But you never know and the package won't tell you what the company used as a coating. A rice cooker will do a fine job, however if you do not have one you can use our fail safe pot rice recipe which has served many well in the past.
Again, rice sold in the U.S. does not have talc.
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Old 07-13-2009, 08:42 PM   #14
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I am with Scotch on this one. I prefer stickier types of rice. I am not one for individual grains. I have done blind taste tests at home with washing and not washing. Tasting the rice plain I was able to tell a difference even if it was somewhat subtle, but I never eat rice plain. It is always served with other food that generally has a sauce or somethng else. Once you combine the rice with sauce or whatever then I did not notice the difference anymore. So now I don't rince as it is an added step I don't find makes a difference for me.
We eat a lot of plain rice with Asian and other dishes, and if there's a difference in the taste of rinsed versus not-rinsed rice, it has escaped me for the past 40 years or so. OTOH, I've never done a side-by-side comparison. In any case, I suspect the difference is pretty much insignificant, and neither is noticeably better that the other -- right or not?
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Old 07-13-2009, 08:52 PM   #15
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I suspect the difference is pretty much insignificant, and neither is noticeably better that the other -- right or not?
Absolutely. When I did my side by side comparison I noticed a difference because I was looking for it. It was very slight, and could have even been in my head. If I were just eating and not doing a comparison I would never notice or be able to discern if it was washed or not.
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Old 07-13-2009, 10:17 PM   #16
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Absolutely. When I did my side by side comparison I noticed a difference because I was looking for it. It was very slight, and could have even been in my head. If I were just eating and not doing a comparison I would never notice or be able to discern if it was washed or not.
I had something in my head once...i think.
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Old 07-14-2009, 07:16 PM   #17
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I'm making some long-grain brown rice to have with dinner tonight. Nothing fancy, just some Safeway's house brand of rice. It specifically says on the bag that for best results, do not rinse before or after cooking.
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Old 08-14-2009, 02:11 PM   #18
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Hello,

Lately i have been washing my rice but i started thinking that washing my rice before cooking will loose it's vitamins and stuff like that.

Should i have my rice or not to preserve the vitamins?
Yes you should wash your rice but only one time, to remove all the dirt
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Old 08-14-2009, 02:49 PM   #19
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Really it depends alot on what type of rice you are using. Short grained for Sushi, Medium grained or long grained. It also depends on what dish you are preparing.
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Old 08-14-2009, 11:36 PM   #20
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Well ya did pick up a few good tip Miss Connie --------

Another one I do mostly ...Is "toasting" the rice in a skillet with a little oil. You have to keep moving it...stirring, flipping etc, so it want burn. It gives off the best aroma...Then cook it. It want be as white as snow, but it want stick either. Kinda gives the rice a nutty roasted flavor...Mmmmm good!!
Just wanted to highlight this post by Uncle Bob, as this is standard procedure not only in risotto, but also in many pilaf recipes. Coating the rice with a bit of oil ensures separation of grains, and yes, the toasted flavor is highly prized by European traditionalists. In paella, obviously, the toasting is done on the back end. I guess the Mediterranean folk are a bit smarter than the Spaniards, toasting the rice before they actually put it to the water, where the toasting process can be much better controlled.

That said, a good Soccarat really is worth the price of admission. ;)
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