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Old 12-11-2004, 12:34 PM   #31
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Audeo - I have several of the Frugal Gourmet cookbooks - can't remember exactly which one has the recipe for phyllo dough - it consists of 2 words - "buy it" LOL
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Old 12-11-2004, 08:35 PM   #32
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Quote:
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Audeo - I have several of the Frugal Gourmet cookbooks - can't remember exactly which one has the recipe for phyllo dough - it consists of 2 words - "buy it" LOL
ROFL, Elf! I can definately attest to the truth of that statement!!!
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Old 12-11-2004, 09:47 PM   #33
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Audeo, if you have a copy of "Joy of Cooking" there is the recipe and illustrated techniques for making a strudel dough.

Phyllo is about the same - maybe a different recipe for the dough, but the technique is the same. You just have to keep going until it is tissue paper thin.

I'm afraid I don't have the time, patience, or access to a sufficient quantity of the proper medications that would keep me docile for long enough to make phyllo by hand.

Yeah, Elf, The Frug said it somewhere ... unfortunately the way the recipes are indexed it's not easy to find where he said it. Seems it was in the beginning "commentary" on a recipe that used phyllo ... but the indexing is so bad that they are not always singled out unter the topic of phyllo - they end up under some other catagory.
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Old 12-11-2004, 10:21 PM   #34
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ROFL, Michael!

Making phyllo is doomed to Hades, IMO. However, puff pastry is definately do-able! Such things are therapy for me, and a darned sight cheaper than psychiatry!

Of course, making the stuff, in itself, might be a reason for a psyciatric referral...!

Good to see you, Michael! Merry Christmas to you and yours!
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Old 12-12-2004, 02:14 AM   #35
 
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Have spent over an hour rolling through this "education" on why some things turn out and why othes "don't"...seeing as Dougie eats pasta in quantity depending on how the "fresh" ravioli/tortellini wtc I cook up turns out...

I now understand much better the "tiny" issues of some of the problems I've inadvertantly placed in his way...and much better appreciate the advantages of being Canadian, and "living where a whacking great pile of ex-Itallian ex-pats" live...such that "our" flour can do these "extra" things...should I offer to "export" it from the store shelves to you guys? Its simple ecomomics why Canadian Grown flour/wheat is forbidden over the border, much like our lumber, beef and steel....(until its disaster relief. akin to Florida a few years ago!)

Anyways, have much enjoyedthis education abd will be cooking Dougies suppers that much better...he'd "thank" you all, almost as much as I do!

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Old 12-13-2004, 09:00 AM   #36
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This thread finally taught me how to make egg pasta properly. My mistake was measuring flour by volume rather than weight. The dough I make now is much much stiffer than I was used to but a plus is that I find that I don't need to let the pasta dry after rolling it into sheets and prior to cutting it into noodles. I can roll and cut in one work flow. Even angel hair pasta cuts and seperates cleanly. (I'm using a pasta machine).

I am also making a large batch and freezing the dough that I don't use right away. I roll it into balls (about 6oz pieces work well for us) and wrap very well in plastic wrap, then put in a labeled plastic bag. I realize that freezing dough is possibly a culinary no-no for some of you, since sometimes the outside of the dough can darken slightly, but frankly, once the dough is rolled, cut, cooked and sauced, no one knows the difference.
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Old 12-14-2004, 08:07 AM   #37
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Thats very interesting. I would like to know how well the dough survives ther freezing process. Presumably it is made with whole egg and white flour?

I have been thinking of experimenting with frozen ravioli for some time, but have not got around to it. Diet comes first.
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Old 12-14-2004, 09:56 AM   #38
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Quote:
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Thats very interesting. I would like to know how well the dough survives ther freezing process. Presumably it is made with whole egg and white flour?

I have been thinking of experimenting with frozen ravioli for some time, but have not got around to it. Diet comes first.
The dough seems to freeze and defrost just fine and the cooked result is like fresh. As I said in my prior post, it is frozen in a balls (6oz balls - about the size of a racket ball?) and each ball is double or triple wrapped in plastic wrap to make sure there is no moisture loss, then all the pasta balls are put in a plastic bag labeled with the date the pasta was made. (I figured balls would expose the least surface area.)

The day before I want to make pasta, I just put what I want in the frig and let it defrost there. I normally go though a batch of frozen pasta in 4-6 wks. As I mentioned in my prior post, sometimes there's a slight graying of the outside of a pasta ball but I think that's if the storage is longer or maybe the one ball where I saw it happen wasn't wrapped that well. It doesn't mean the pasta is bad and it pretty much disappears into the dough when its rolled out.

I have frozen ravioli also tho I haven't made it recently. You lay them flat in a single layer on a cookie sheet and put the cookie sheet in the frig. As soon as they're frozen solid, you can dump them in ziplock bags and get that darn cookie sheet out of the freezer. To cook, just dump them, frozen, into your simmering water.

I want to thank you again for all your good advice in this thread. It used to take so much longer to make pasta and I had trouble sometimes with the noodles sticking to eachother when cut and all because my dough was too wet! - Oh, yes, the dough is simply eggs and flour (I usually use bread flour but I do think AP would be fine too) using your proportions and then well kneaded for about 10 min. (I personally add no salt or oil to the pasta dough.)

Sometimes I think an ample freezer is a cook's best friend. :? (I sure wish mine was larger!)
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Old 12-14-2004, 10:51 AM   #39
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Opps - mistake in my post and it won't let me go back and edit - re freezing ravioli I said
Quote:
You lay them flat in a single layer on a cookie sheet and put the cookie sheet in the frig.
Of course, "frig" should have been "freezer". My bad, sorry.
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Old 12-18-2004, 09:58 AM   #40
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subfusc, I can attest to your freezing method!

I made a huge batch of ravioli last Sunday and laid the raviolis on waxed paper on a cookie sheet and froze them for a couple of hours, then dumped them unceremoniously into a large heavy-duty ziploc and stored them in the freezer. On Wednesday night after getting home, I removed a dinner-sized amount of the raviolis from the ziploc and placed those on waxed paper-lined cookie sheets and allowed them to thaw in the refrigerator. Thursday evening, I cooked them and they were the same texture as if they had been made immediately before cooking...but saved me a good hour's time in preparing dinner that evening.

As something of a test, I have taken the balance of the raviolis now, in their same ziploc, and wrapped it well with freezer paper and placed into the deep freeze. I'm going to leave them there for a couple of weeks and see if that length of time frozen makes a negative impact on the taste and texture. Time will tell...

I've also frozed balls of dough, but prefer to go ahead and cut the noodles or make raviolis before freezing. Just a personal preferance to save more time getting to the dinner table during hectic days.
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