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Old 08-22-2006, 11:53 PM   #1
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Why are there different shapes of pasta?

Why, they all taste the same... well to me
but (mind my spelling) penne, spaghetti, fetticuini, bowties, ect. they all taste the same.
I know there are a few that are stuffed but i just dont get the others...

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Old 08-23-2006, 12:00 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goboenomo
Why, they all taste the same... well to me
but (mind my spelling) penne, spaghetti, fetticuini, bowties, ect. they all taste the same.
I know there are a few that are stuffed but i just dont get the others...
Welcome to the site!!!!!!!!

Well, some sauces are very heavy and meaty and would take a bigger pasta, such as mostaccioli, for example.

Other pastas are very delicate like white clam sauce and take one of my favorites, linguini. The linquini is not as small as say angel hair so more sauce sticks to the pasta.

Basically the bigger the pasta the heavier the sauce - rigate is any pasta with ridges - these hold even extra sauce. Radiatore is good when I make a pasta salad where I want all the dressing or olive oil to creep into all the circular parts and cling on.

Does that help at all with the thought process behind choosing the right shape for the dish? And yes, they all taste the same until you get into the spinach pasta, etc.
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Old 08-23-2006, 12:04 AM   #3
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Oh
ok
I never thought of that.
When I saw you put meaty sauces i thought you were gonna say smaller pastas go with it to make it less filling.

Cool :D
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Old 08-23-2006, 10:55 AM   #4
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LOL - that makes sense though!
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Old 08-23-2006, 11:17 AM   #5
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They do all taste the same, but try using the same sauce with different pastas, (even ones they are not "meant" for) to see the different effects. Carbonara with a spagetti or linguine is deliciously lightly comforting, with angel's hair it becaomes stodge.....(much to my husband's disgust there are times on bad days in winter I prefer the stodge). And those tiny pastas are really filling. They become denser and,more substancial in a pasta bake than larger shells or farfalle.

Kitchenself's explanation is spot on, but I still recommend you experiment to find unusual combinations that suit your taste.
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Old 08-23-2006, 11:56 AM   #6
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Interesting.. I thought it was to add variety so people didn't get bored with the food.. hah
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Old 08-23-2006, 11:57 AM   #7
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They all may taste pretty much the same, but the texture in the mouth differs significantly with the shape (e.g., angle hair vs. rigatoni), and that's a large part of the pleasure of eating -- otherwise, we could throw everything in the blender and drink it through a straw.
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Old 08-23-2006, 12:08 PM   #8
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KE pretty much explained it all, spot on, I just would like to add that with pasta, not only the flavour itself but also the texture contributes to the enjoyment of eating pasta, and the variety of shapes provides some different "feel" when you bite into them. Exactly what kind of sauce goes with what shapes, there are some old standards (amatriciana with bucatini, penne rigate with arabbiata, vongole with linguini etc.), but pretty much depends on your own preference and taste. With some recipes I could use just about any shapes, but some others I have some preferences, though it is difficult for me to explain why... also some people loves slurping on long pastas, others prefer short versions, which makes less mess as you eat them.
Just experiment with different shapes and recipes, maybe you discover some differences or your own favourites/preferences... have fun!! That is what pasta eating/cooking is all about!!
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Old 08-23-2006, 02:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
Welcome to the site!!!!!!!!

Well, some sauces are very heavy and meaty and would take a bigger pasta, such as mostaccioli, for example.

Other pastas are very delicate like white clam sauce and take one of my favorites, linguini. The linquini is not as small as say angel hair so more sauce sticks to the pasta.

Basically the bigger the pasta the heavier the sauce - rigate is any pasta with ridges - these hold even extra sauce. Radiatore is good when I make a pasta salad where I want all the dressing or olive oil to creep into all the circular parts and cling on.

Does that help at all with the thought process behind choosing the right shape for the dish? And yes, they all taste the same until you get into the spinach pasta, etc.
and besides that explantion one shape pasta would be boring
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Old 08-23-2006, 02:55 PM   #10
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My favourites at the moment are bucatini and mezza zita....both are long tubular pastas with holes in the middle, like straws. Bucantini are skinny and mezza zita are bigger.
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