"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-01-2007, 01:19 PM   #11
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,783
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexR View Post
Hi,
Is it simply that they add cream at the end?

I mean, I do use the right kind of rice, arborio or carnaroli.

I make a good enough risotto, and it absorbs plenty of liquid (wine and broth) but why, oh why, is risotto so much more unctuous when I eat out in a restaurant?

Yours sincerley,
Alex Rychlewski
Hi AlexR.

Perhaps you could post your recipe and method. There's some good info here:

http://italianfood.about.com/od/tips...a/aa091697.htm

If you want a richer risotto, stir in heavy cream in addition to the butter -- and I've seen some recipes that use cream cheese. Again, would help to see your recipe & method.
__________________

__________________
*amy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 01:22 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Ok, back to topic, and here's my two cents:

I agree with GB that we need to see the entire recipe, or at least the steps that you used to make it.

After the rice was cooked, did you take it off the heat, and fold in parmesan cheese and whole butter? That's what I do at work.
__________________

__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 01:38 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Bordeaux
Posts: 179
My business is words and, of course, words have different meanings depending on the context.

While an unctuous used-car salesman is a definitely slimy so-and-so, I agree with GB that the adjective is far and away a positive one when referring to food. No stretch at all.

As to my cooking method, here goes:

I cook the rice at medium-low heat in butter in a very large frying pan for perhaps 3-5 minutes. Then I add about 25 cl. of white wine. Thereafter, I ladle in chicken stock throughout the next, oh, 45 minutes or so.

I add other ingredients along the way (peas, diced meat, vegetables I have previously fried, etc.).

The rice is moist, there's enough left over liquid in the risotto to make a rich sauce, but it ain't *creamy*, as I said in my original post.

Best regards,
Alex R.
__________________
AlexR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 01:39 PM   #14
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Bordeaux
Posts: 179
Oh, and I add the Parmesan cheese to the risotte just 5 minutes before serving it.

Alex R.
__________________
AlexR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 01:40 PM   #15
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
What temp is the liquid when you add it? How often do you stir it?
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 01:52 PM   #16
Head Chef
 
DramaQueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 1,347
Perfect risotto can be made by using arborio or carnaroli rice, sauteed for a few minutes in butter, wine added and when the wine evaporates start adding 1/2 cup of hot chicken broth. Keep the heat at low so you only have a slow simmer. Stir constantly to develop the starch (which is why risotto is creamy) and when the chicken broth is evaportated add another 1/2 cup repeating the steps for about 25 minutes til the rice is cooked. Be careful not to overcook risotto or it becomes too starchy and mushy. During the last 10 minutes add whatever your going to add to it like mushrooms, peas, prosciutto etc. I always add freshly grated parmesan cheese at the last couple of minutes to keep the cheese from clumping. Perfect, creamy delicious risotto every time. I learned this from my mom who came from Italy and knows risotto.
__________________
Visit my blogsite: Chew On This
DramaQueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 02:01 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,698
ok, yous made me go look (in a real, hardbound dictionary), it is derived from a latin root, meaning of or like the oil used in an annointment.

so, it refers to the oiliness/texture of an object, be it good or bad. SOME foods would benefit from being unctuous, others, not.

i maintain that describing creaminess in terms of rice as pleasently oily is a stretch.

i know you are, but what am i?
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 02:05 PM   #18
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Bucky in terms of food it is not saying it is pleasantly oily in those words. It is saying it has a rich full mouth feel. It is saying the same thing, but in different words.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 02:08 PM   #19
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 3,619
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
ok, yous made me go look (in a real, hardbound dictionary), it is derived from a latin root, meaning of or like the oil used in an annointment.

so, it refers to the oiliness/texture of an object, be it good or bad. SOME foods would benefit from being unctuous, others, not.

i maintain that describing creaminess in terms of rice as pleasently oily is a stretch.

i know you are, but what am i?
OMG bt, have you ever watched the Nanny show (Nanny 911, I think)? I'm scared they're gonna create a naughty chair just for you. But I must admit, I have only ever heard the word unctuous used with very negative connotations. (I used to sell cars.)
__________________
Fisher's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2007, 02:12 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,698
lol, i know. i can't help it, having been raised in a family of writers and english teachers.

it means different things to different people. i've always heard it used as a negative adjective, but learned something today.

i'd better stop before i get "annointed" with some risotto.
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.