"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-21-2006, 11:14 PM   #1
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 61
Wild Rice/brown Rice/jasmine Rice

#1 Hey guys, i have a question in regards to rice. Ive eaten brown rice before, but it tastes very dry. Is there a brown rice that is moist and tasty just like basmati white rice?

#2 Has anyone tried canadian wild rice? It looks black in appearence. Is it tasteful? I hope it doesnt taste dry. Does it have a lot of fiber?

#3 I heard Jasmine rice tastes pretty good, what are your thoughts on that?

__________________

__________________
Buffwannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2006, 12:10 AM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 751
Quote:
#1 Hey guys, i have a question in regards to rice. Ive eaten brown rice before, but it tastes very dry. Is there a brown rice that is moist and tasty just like basmati white rice?
Mmm when properly prepared Basmati rice should actually be fairly dry, with the grains remaining seperate.

Quote:
#3 I heard Jasmine rice tastes pretty good, what are your thoughts on that?
Jasmine rice should be your rice of choice when making any dish that hails from South-East Asia. It has a beautiful fragrance and great taste that accompanies Thai, Vietnamese and other associated cuisines dishes very well. When buying jasmine rice it has to have an aroma about it, if it just smells like rice or has a musty smell about it then it is either very old rice, or inferior quality. Try to buy jasmine rice that has been imported from Thailand or Vietnam.
__________________

__________________
Haggis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2006, 04:33 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I tried and tried to like brown rice, and ultimately gave up. Always wound up just too chewy and often pieces of hull wound up in my teeth. Wild rice -- I think all I've had is from Minnesota. It took me awhile to get used to cooking it, but I do like it. I'd first had it in packaged "Long Grain and Wild" rice mixtures, and when I tried to do it from scratch, I quickly learned that the wild needs longer cooking time than the long grain white rice. MN wild rice comes in three grades -- very broken up (for casseroles, or as some in the area say, "hot dish"), medium (some whole, some broken) which is good for most dishes, and the stuff that is perfectly whole (for elegant presentations). Wild rice, with the aformentioned long grain added in, cooked in stock with onions and garlic, make a wonderful stuffing for poultry, especially duck and cornish game hens. When you try this rice, find a good recipe and stick to it the first time.

Jasmine is the best rice for Thai food. It has a lot of characteristics in common with Basmati -- very fragrant, long grains.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2006, 04:37 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Time for a food story. I was sitting in a beauty salon in Hawaii, getting a hair cut. My young beautician had just returned from her first trip to the mainland. "I wouldn't like it there ... I ordered some rice in a restaurant and you know what they gave me????? Twigs! TWIGS!!!!" So much for the glories of wild rice! Most local families I knew ate Cal-Rose short grain rice every day. There were a lot of Thai food places, so most had tasted Jasmine. But that wild rice .... well, forget it! I almost ruined my haircut, I laughed so hard.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2006, 05:12 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Suus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Holland
Posts: 31
Brown rice is definitely chewy, and is very different from Basmati or any other peeled/white rice.

I learned to like it, but always eat it with a 'moisturiser' like a sauce of any kind, some creme fraiche or at least a good drizzle of olive oil after it's cooked.

Wild rice is even more chewy, but has a nice nutty flavour. I use it as a salad 'starch' with arugola, grilled tomatoes, slivers of soft feta cheese and lots of olive oil.

And Jasmine rice is indeed the right rice to use for south-east asian cooking. Basmati is the one you want when cooking east-indian.
__________________
Suus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.