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Old 09-20-2005, 12:09 PM   #11
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Hi!!!!

I totally agree with you on the "American" versions of Italian food. My grandfather is Italian and he doesnt eat to live but rather lives to eat. So I know all these differences. Nevertheless, I just love alfredo sauce on my pasta and italian dressing on my salad.

When I was in China, I ate some things I think no western person could ever think of. The food in China is just so different from the Chop Suey drive thru.

I guess it is just a matter of interpretation but for those who are interested, mexican burritos are also an American invention. No mexican across the border will ever serve burritos for dinner.

Oh, and Santa Claus is just a marketing gimmick of Coca cola. The traditional version of Santa is St. Nicholas.
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Old 09-20-2005, 12:16 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paolita
I guess it is just a matter of interpretation but for those who are interested, mexican burritos are also an American invention. No mexican across the border will ever serve burritos for dinner.

Oh, and Santa Claus is just a marketing gimmick of Coca cola. The traditional version of Santa is St. Nicholas.
And I bet no chihuahua in Mexico would want Taco Bell, either!!

In Italy, the real St. Nick is called "Babbo Natale"!!
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Old 09-20-2005, 12:27 PM   #13
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Quote:
In Italy, the real St. Nick is called "Babbo Natale"
And it's a tooth mouse, not a tooth fairy...or so I've been told
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Old 09-20-2005, 12:34 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ICadvisor
And it's a tooth mouse, not a tooth fairy...or so I've been told
That is so funny! I just got an image of a mouse with huge human size teeth in its mouth.
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Old 09-20-2005, 12:38 PM   #15
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whoa Jessica, I didn't know that one!! I must ask Cristiano this evening, oh wait better ask Lucilla, his daughter... she's got one loose tooth about to fall off!!
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Old 09-20-2005, 12:41 PM   #16
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whoa Jessica, I didn't know that one!! I must ask Cristiano this evening, oh wait better ask Lucilla, his daughter... she's got one loose tooth about to fall off!!
I wonder if it is the same through out the whole country??? I know that when my husband told me I thought the idea was a bit scary, mice are not the sort of thing I'd like to imagine crawling around under my pillow...
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Old 09-20-2005, 12:45 PM   #17
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Well depend on what kind of mouse... I wouldn't mind my little Napoleon around my pillow I just have to be careful not to squish him...

Napoleone, my white hammy!!
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Old 09-20-2005, 01:22 PM   #18
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In Spanish, or at least in Colombia, a mouse whose last name is Perez comes around looking for teeth too!!!
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Old 09-20-2005, 01:50 PM   #19
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Thanks! You took a lot of time to think about this. Nice!
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Old 09-20-2005, 03:03 PM   #20
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Thanks for sharing. I always wonder how food get's transformed to suit the palate of the audience. I am sure all cuisines go through these transformations.

I know about Indian cuisine. There are many dishes that are altered to suit the American palate. Dishes like papadums (called papads in India) are accompainements with rice and dal (not dahl) but here in the US, restaurants serve them as appetizers with dipping sauces.

Chicken tikka masala to me is a totally western concoction. I never heard of it in India and I grew up there. A lot of recipes here are embellished with cream and sour cream which is not readily available in India.

Use of packaged curry powders is not something you find in Indian households (yes not even in the US). A lot of these powders are specifically made for the western market.

The term chutney has also undergone a transformation - cranberries to apples to anything and everything under the sun can now be combined to make a chutney. Just throw in some ginger and curry powder along with sugar and you have a chutney. Again in India chutney refers to a specific preparation of herbs (such as mint or cilantro chutney). Most of the other prepartion with fruits and veggies are called Achaars. There are both sweet and savory achaars.

Finally packaged naans are nowhere to be found in India (well maybe now they must be but they surely were not when I was there). Indian's eat roti (simple bread made with wheat flour) with their everyday meals and in most household these are made fresh everyday. Naan's are strictly limited to restaurants.
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