"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Ethnic Foods
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-20-2006, 09:20 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NW NJ
Posts: 1,884
Ajwan seed

We have a new Indian market in town (hurray!) that has an amazing array of familiar and unfamiliar foods. I have cooked and enjoyed Indian foods, but have had problems getting the necesary ingredients. I have now hauled out some neglected cookbooks and am like a pig in ****. Today I went in to resupply some of my spices and herbs--they have an atonishing array that includes non-traditional Indian offerings--but could not find sage. I asked, and was directed to a substitute, Ajwan seed. The flavor is similar in some ways to sage, but it is much more full-flavored with a bit more spiciness. Does anyone have experience with this? I was reluctant substituting a seed for a leaf, but it was delicious on chicken legs accompanied by garlic, salt, and pepper.

BTW, the proprietor told me that tomorrow is his culture's equivalent to Christmas, and the day after is New Year's Day. If this is true for you, then I wish you joy in the holidays!

__________________

__________________
bullseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2006, 09:43 PM   #2
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 298
I usually see thyme listed as a substitute for Ajwain. If you buy any asofetida, store it outside the house. that stuff has a strong penetrating odor.
__________________

__________________
thymeless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2006, 10:05 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NW NJ
Posts: 1,884
Quote:
Originally Posted by thymeless
I usually see thyme listed as a substitute for Ajwain. If you buy any asofetida, store it outside the house. that stuff has a strong penetrating odor.
Thanks for the heads up. I ran into it once, at a friend's house. It was in a jar within a jar, and smelled strongly of anise and other scents.
__________________
bullseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2006, 04:13 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
boufa06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Volos, Greece
Posts: 3,467
Today, Hindus all over the world celebrate Deepavali or Diwali meaning Festival of Lights. It is also their new year. To our Hindu members, Happy Deepavali!
__________________
boufa06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2006, 05:33 PM   #5
Sous Chef
 
cliveb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Caracas, Venezuela
Posts: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullseye
We have a new Indian market in town (hurray!) that has an amazing array of familiar and unfamiliar foods. I have cooked and enjoyed Indian foods, but have had problems getting the necesary ingredients. I have now hauled out some neglected cookbooks and am like a pig in ****. Today I went in to resupply some of my spices and herbs--they have an atonishing array that includes non-traditional Indian offerings--but could not find sage. I asked, and was directed to a substitute, Ajwan seed. The flavor is similar in some ways to sage, but it is much more full-flavored with a bit more spiciness. Does anyone have experience with this? I was reluctant substituting a seed for a leaf, but it was delicious on chicken legs accompanied by garlic, salt, and pepper.

BTW, the proprietor told me that tomorrow is his culture's equivalent to Christmas, and the day after is New Year's Day. If this is true for you, then I wish you joy in the holidays!
Ajman or Ajwain seed, also known as Bishops Weed or Thymol.It does have a very vague thyme-like flavour; I'd never have thought to use it as a sub for sage, but hey, why not? I've used it in pickles - it's delicious. You could also use it with stir-fried carrots.
As with all spices, use a little at a time.

Regarding asafoetida - I don't think its THAT strong. Fermented black beans or just plain old curry powder are far more pungent, in my opinion. Asafoetida is also delicious - but it's a bit of an acquired taste. Use it when cooking dried beans, peas or lentils; it's supposed to prevent "gas"!!!
__________________
cliveb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2006, 06:02 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NW NJ
Posts: 1,884
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliveb
Ajman or Ajwain seed, also known as Bishops Weed or Thymol.It does have a very vague thyme-like flavour; I'd never have thought to use it as a sub for sage, but hey, why not? I've used it in pickles - it's delicious. You could also use it with stir-fried carrots.
As with all spices, use a little at a time.
Thanks, cliveb. You're right about Ajwan (Ajwain) being more appropriate as a sub for thyme (or, perhaps, vice versa). I wonder if the storekeeper was confusing sage with thyme? It did work well on the chicken. Regardless, my spice repertoire has expanded! Can't wait to try it on stir fry carrots.
__________________
bullseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2006, 08:02 PM   #7
Head Chef
 
Yakuta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,208
Ajwain as correctly pointed out is more in line with Thyme than Sage. We use it rather sparingly in Indian cooking.

Indians believe that different spices have different medicinal/healing qualities. Ajwain along with Fennel and Dill seeds are used as a digestive. We normally add it to beans or dishes that are hard on your system. A tiny bit of ajwain seeds in pakoras (these are made with chick pea flour, spices and potatoes and onions) is absolutely delish.

We also roast an equal mixture of ajwain seeds, dill seeds and fennel seeds in a dry skillet (until it's aromatic) and salt it lightly and eat it as an after dinner condiment. It's like a mint or digestive after a heavy Indian meal. It is amazing in taking away any foul odors from your mouth.
__________________
Yakuta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2006, 09:46 PM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliveb
Regarding asafoetida - I don't think its THAT strong. Fermented black beans or just plain old curry powder are far more pungent, in my opinion. Asafoetida is also delicious - but it's a bit of an acquired taste. Use it when cooking dried beans, peas or lentils; it's supposed to prevent "gas"!!!
The flavors great. I'm just talking about the smell it exudes just sitting in the cupboard. After I bought my first jar of it, I moved it to the garage the next morning as the whole kitchen stunk of asafoetida. thymeless
__________________
thymeless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2006, 02:48 AM   #9
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 665
For questions like these and infact for any information about any spice, the following site is NOT to be beat. It's just mind-bogglingly comprehensive! (I couldn't live without it because it includes Greek in its long list of languages into which the spices are translated.)

http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/index.html
__________________

__________________
XeniA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]