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Old 09-14-2007, 10:15 AM   #51
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Hi Shanti, I don't have a tandoor but you can make a very close replica of it in the oven or the grill.

And as far as tandoor's go you can buy them in most major cities in US. They have Indian restaurant supply stores and you can look them up. I know Houston has a lot of them for example that will ship you a tandoor if you like. They have the portable kinds.

Also pav bhaji is how it's spelled but the correct pronunciation when you speak is Paav (long A sound) and Bhaaji (Again long A sound) which translates literally into bread and dry curry and yes I was born in Mumbai and grew up there so I know many places there that make a mean one. It's relatively easy to make it at home as well.
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Old 09-15-2007, 12:44 AM   #52
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Do you make the Portugese bread they serve with Pav Bhaji?

I know I can get a Tandoor but they are over $1000. I do a great Tandoori chicken on the smoker. The taste is amazing. It's just that Tandoor-real tandoor Indian Pomfret is amazing. Well you know. The way the heat instantly sears the outside and every drop of moisture is sealed inside. You eat the fins, tail, most of the head, oh my it is amazing!

Do you make breadfruit curry like they make in Kerela? I'd love a recipe for that. It is so tasty. We often make idli and sambhar as a lunch, but in India it is my favourite breakfast. Vada is OK. I do also love a Masala Dosa and we have many restaurants here that make thm. There are more Indians here than pobably anywhere outside India so we have so many great spots.

Do you return to India often? I am missing it so much. I normally am there 5 or 6 times a year but not now.
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Old 09-15-2007, 02:01 AM   #53
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I'm an Indian

But it is almost impossible for anyone to know all Indian dishes or recipes because the diversity in Indian culture, food habits, climates and vegetation is huge.
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Old 09-15-2007, 08:40 PM   #54
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It's true... I come from Malaysia where there are Indians and I'll bet you anything their curries are much different from the mainland.

I love curries though! Whatever the choice, spicier the better! Hmmm! Hungry already!!!!
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Old 09-16-2007, 01:12 AM   #55
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So true, not only does every dish vary by region but every cook as everywhere in the world will be different. That is the delight of cooking it is always an evolution and if it weren't it would be boring. Depending on our moods, the ingredients which deped on the weather and terrior it will be different, but that is wonderful!

Desi food is often the best!
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Old 09-16-2007, 08:07 AM   #56
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Most of the food you are getting in the restaurant s out of India has the influence from the out side world starting from the Alexander the great. Each invasion brought different cuisines and taste to India. The real Indian food is very much different. The taste and texture varies from state to state, creed to creed. Most of the north Indian food goes along well with bread products like naan or even pizza base. South Indian foods are good with rice and rice cakes. The balancing of the food is very much important in the Indian cuisine due to the heavy y usage of spices. I f you are eating north Indian you can have one glass of buttermilk or lassi. It is rasam for south India.
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Old 09-17-2007, 03:41 PM   #57
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Obe of my favouites is the old Awadhi recipes. I make several of these. They take an entire day and can often contain a total of 4 or 5 masalas totaling 30+ spices. Obne

Some very difficult to find. For instance Lazzat-e-Taam contains 25 spices/ingredients and it is just the finishing for Kundan Kaliya.

Some ingredients for the Lazzat-e-Taam (Avadhi garam masala) are Mitha ittr, baobeer, makhana, and jarakush not so readily available.
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Old 09-18-2007, 12:17 AM   #58
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My most favourite dish is plain rice with chicken curry & tomato chutney.
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Old 09-19-2007, 05:53 AM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shantihhh View Post
Some ingredients for the Lazzat-e-Taam (Avadhi garam masala) are Mitha ittr, baobeer, makhana, and jarakush not so readily available.
Where do u buy them, Shantihhh?
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Old 09-19-2007, 07:25 PM   #60
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Mel - Baobeer and Jarakhus are not so commonly found. You get them in ayurvedic stores. Jarakhus is the root of the poppy seed plant.

Makhana - Are easily available in Indian stores. They are white puffy and look like popcorn and are pretty tasteless. They are lotus seeds that are popped just like corn kernels

Mitha Ittr - Also available in Indian stores. You can ask for Kewra essence. Kewra is a very aromatic flower that grows in the tropics. The essence of that flower is called Mitha Ittr

Out of all the ingredients in the list the only one that makes a difference to your palate is kewra. I normally add it to the biryani I make (it's like a Spanish version of Paella). It adds a depth of flavor that is very authentic in moghulai cuisine.

As far as the other ingredients go they are common to the Awadhi or Dum Pukht cuisine that was popular during the Moghul rule. It is not authentic to all Indian cuisine and I would bet that most palates are not that refined (even me being Indian) to differentiate the couple of these ingredients from others.

Makhana is normally used in sweet preparations.
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