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Old 01-03-2012, 11:39 PM   #21
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May try hanging the cottage cheese for a while in cheesecloth to remove some whey/liquid. Just a thought.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:41 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Not according to the cookbook.
Yeah, but sometimes people confuse BP and BS. Maybe the author was thinking of BS when she wrote BP.

My sister is a chemical engineer and she swore to me that I could get baking soda in Denmark. When I got there she had already bought it. It was, as I expected, baking powder. When I pointed that out to her she said, "D'oh!"
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Old 01-04-2012, 09:35 AM   #23
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Here are the dough ingredients:

2 Pkt Active Dry Yeast
2½ C Warm Water
2 tsp Sugar
1½ Tb Salt
¾ C Melted Shortening
10 C Flour

I bloomed the yeast then added the flour and shortening and kneaded it in my KA mixer. Let it rest until it doubled then portioned it into dough balls which rested for a short period before we started rolling out the dough.

I don't know when I/we will do this again. I will report back when I do.

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Old 01-04-2012, 12:34 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
In Armenian these are called bunirr ov bereg ...
Let me ask my Armenian friends about this.
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:02 PM   #25
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Thanks Andy. I'm tempted to try this myself once you've got the recipe straightened out.
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:06 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Thanks Andy. I'm tempted to try this myself once you've got the recipe straightened out.
You've got the filling recipe in my OP and the dough recipe. Brush with egg wash and cut two holes in each. Bake at 375º F for 12-15 minutes.

Just be sure to leave out the BP!

Actually, I had twice as much dough as I needed so you could cut back the dough quantities.
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Old 01-04-2012, 03:31 PM   #27
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Checked couple places, nobody heard of BP in that kind of recipe.
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Old 01-05-2012, 11:06 AM   #28
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Andy here is a link to a short video of a simular produkt, it is in Russian, but you might like it anyways:



My moth is watering just looking. I think I'll have to make some this weekend.
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Old 01-05-2012, 12:52 PM   #29
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This recipe comes from (Treasured Armenian Recipes) from the Armenian General Benevolent Union.

Beoreg
Dough: 3-1/2 C flour. 1/2 t sugar
1/2 cup milk. 1/2 yeast cake
1/2 cup melted butter. 3 T olive oil
2 eggs. for your hands
1 t salt

Filling: Mix the following
1 pound cheese, grated. 1/2 t salt
1/2 lb cottage cheese. Chopped parsley to taste
2 eggs. ( optional)


Beat the eggs, add the salt, sugar, milk and the butter, and mix well. Dissolve the yeast in a tablespoon of cold water and add to the first mixture.
Start adding the flour gradually, then knead the dough thoroughly. Divide into 30 balls the size of a walnut. Roll out each ball to 6 or 7 inches in diameter, brush with melted butter and fold like a handkerchief brushing with each fold. Put these bundles on a plate and put in refrigerator. It could be kept this way for several days.

Roll out each bundle 4 to 5 inches square, put a spoonful of filling over a triangle, dab cold water around the edges, fold over the other half, corner to opposite corner, covering the filling. Pinch the edges together, overlapping, a little. Make 3 tiny holes on top with the point of a knife. To prevent the
cheese from oozing out from the sides. Brush itch butter or beaten egg, arrange on a cookie sheet and let stand in a warm place for 3 hours. Bake in a 350 degree oven 20-30 minutes
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Old 01-05-2012, 01:16 PM   #30
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Thank you. I have this cookbook.

The recipe I used came from Rose Baboian's book.
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Armenian Cheese Turnover Issue [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]Last week my younger daughter and I got together for a cooking day. She has shown an interest in learning to cook some Armenian recipes she remembers from when my mom was alive and from my older sister’s kitchen.[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]We had settled on cheese turnovers. I remember cheese turnovers from my childhood. I would wait in the kitchen for them to come out of the oven and wolf them down as soon as they cooled enough to eat. In recent years, my sister made a different version using filo dough in a baking dish similar to paklava. My daughter wanted to make the more traditional version.[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]I checked my ‘go to’ Armenian cookbook written by a long deceased Armenian woman and generally regarded as the bible of Armenian recipes. I found a filling recipe and a dough recipe for the turnovers (there were several variations) and we were set.[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]On the big day, we made the dough first and set it aside to rise then made the filling. DD rolled out the dough into 7” circles per the cookbook and I added 1/3 of a cup of filling. She sealed it off and I eggwashed it and cut slits in the top all per the recipe. [/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]Sadly, when they baked, a lot of the filling poured out of the slits in the top of the turnover. The sealed edges were fine. They tasted great and I’d love to make them again but have to solve the spillage issue.[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]Here’s the filling recipe: [/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]2 Lb Munster Cheese, shredded[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]1 C Cottage Cheese, small curd[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]2 Eggs[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]½ tsp Baking Powder[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]3 Tb Butter, melted[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4][FONT=PC명]¾[/FONT] C Parsley[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]I have questions. [/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]What is the purpose of the baking powder? I know it’s a leavener but why does the filling have to be leavened? So it can spill out of the turnover and ruin my day? Does it aid in making the domed shape for the top of the turnover by pushing the dough up from inside? What would happen if I left out the baking powder?[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]If you cut the turnover in half after it’s cooked and cooled, the filling is a layer on the bottom of the turnover with an empty dome of dough above. I don’ t get it.[/SIZE][/FONT][SIZE=4] [/SIZE] [FONT=Arial][SIZE=4]Any thoughts?[/SIZE][/FONT] 3 stars 1 reviews
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