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Old 01-29-2011, 02:03 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
I'm interested in the batter recipe...is it close to an egg foo yung batter?
There are okonomiyaki joints throughout Japan, just like pizza places here. Tables have a hot teppan gridle in the middle. Everyone gets a bowl of batter, an egg and small spatula. There's a communal tray of all sorts of ingredients. You crack the egg into the batter. Add whatever ingredients you like, mix it all together. Possible ingredients is a long list, but chopped cabbage is very common. Gridle it up just like a pancake. A list of toppings is long, too, but common are mayo, an A-1 like sauce, dried bonito flakes, pickled ginger, and herbs.

Asian markets might sell several brands of pre-mix, just add water & egg. As well as sauces.

Made from scratch, the batter contains 1 special ingredient. It makes the batter sort of glutinous, almost like very soft mozzarella, and the finished pancake is crunchy on the outside but quite wet on the inside.

okonomi yaki batter
1:1 sifted all purpose flour and dashi soup stock
pinch of baking powder and salt
grated yama imo (mountain potato), about 1 oz of it for 1 cup batter

When grated, the yama imo metamorphs into a funky, mucilaginous texture, not unlike a beaten raw egg. I'm not sure about a suitable substitute, maybe arrowroot flour, possibly liquefying a waxy potato.

It's simple, fast, fun to cook and eat.
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:01 AM   #22
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Tom Kha--coconut chicken soup, with fish sauce, lemon, garlic and ginger. It is supposed to have lemon grass, cilantro and Thai basil, but I usually can't find those ingredients unless I grow them in the summer. Mine is not authentic, but it is good. And I sometimes use the same flavorings (coco milk, fish sauce, lemon juice and zest, grated ginger and garlic) with a base of stir fried chicken and/or shrimp, celery, water chestnuts, etc. served with jasmine rice. No recipe, I just play it by ear--or tongue, maybe I should say.
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Old 01-29-2011, 07:54 AM   #23
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I can't pin it down to a single culture, but have been leaning heavily toward Thai. About 1/3 of the door shelf space in our fridge is devoted to Asian ingredients. Our pantry has a good selection as well.

I like making Thai curry pastes from scratch as the flavor is far superior to bottled/jared and you aren't just limited to red or green. The only ingedient that seems unavailable is kaffir lime leaves. I have found a suitable substitute in key lime leaves. Luckily I have a tree in my back yard. I understand that this type of lime is what is actually used in Mexican cuisine when lime is an ingredient.

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Old 01-29-2011, 03:31 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spork View Post
There are okonomiyaki joints throughout Japan, just like pizza places here. Tables have a hot teppan gridle in the middle. Everyone gets a bowl of batter, an egg and small spatula. There's a communal tray of all sorts of ingredients. You crack the egg into the batter. Add whatever ingredients you like, mix it all together. Possible ingredients is a long list, but chopped cabbage is very common. Gridle it up just like a pancake. A list of toppings is long, too, but common are mayo, an A-1 like sauce, dried bonito flakes, pickled ginger, and herbs.

Asian markets might sell several brands of pre-mix, just add water & egg. As well as sauces.

Made from scratch, the batter contains 1 special ingredient. It makes the batter sort of glutinous, almost like very soft mozzarella, and the finished pancake is crunchy on the outside but quite wet on the inside.

okonomi yaki batter
1:1 sifted all purpose flour and dashi soup stock
pinch of baking powder and salt
grated yama imo (mountain potato), about 1 oz of it for 1 cup batter

When grated, the yama imo metamorphs into a funky, mucilaginous texture, not unlike a beaten raw egg. I'm not sure about a suitable substitute, maybe arrowroot flour, possibly liquefying a waxy potato.

It's simple, fast, fun to cook and eat.
Thanks...looks like a good vehicle for chopped ingredients. Copied and pasted along with addition ideas.
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Old 02-12-2011, 06:17 PM   #25
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Okonomiyaki is one of my favorites from when I lived in Japan. The recipe I use doesn't use the Yama Imo mentioned above and I've really not noted much difference with what I make here and what I had in Japan. There are a few good recipes all over the web for Okonomiyaki, But I use the recipe at about.com's japanese food section.

-Damien
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Old 02-12-2011, 08:41 PM   #26
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Oh man, I forgot about dim sum, especially pot stickers.

Craig
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Old 02-12-2011, 08:54 PM   #27
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I will next try my hand at wontons for soup and for frying.

And I'd like to try making egg rolls after that.

All the Asian recipes I have tried so far have been keepers.
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Old 02-12-2011, 09:07 PM   #28
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My asparagus and roasted red pepper makizushi fell apart, but it still tasted good. I used sesame oil and srirachi as a dipping sauce.
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Old 02-12-2011, 11:48 PM   #29
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Won Ton soup
Fried rice
Sweet and sour chicken
Mongolian Beef
Sushi
Egg Rolls
Cream Cheese Puffs
Lo Main noodles
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Old 02-13-2011, 12:51 AM   #30
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I'm blessed with friends that make great Asian food, and I've made some that could be called "good," but I have to admit that I've made only one Asian dish that I did not feel lacked "something." I think it could be because I am not well-versed in Asian seasonings and basic cooking techniques to figure what is missing or what needs tweaked. I've made really pretty maki, but it is missing something! I have no clue what it could be. Same with stir fry or fried rice! Missing something.

The only Asian dish that I have made that I was completely satisfied in how it turned out was the Sesame Noodles from Dragon Lady's Kitchen. I love Thai food, Japanese food, and Chinese food. I really miss a Cantonese place in my hometown that closed a few years back as it used more native ingredients than any other place I have found. (I cannot remember the last time I saw a dish with lotus root.)

Any how, I will freely admit to not being a good cook when it comes to Asian food, but I am willing to try to improve. Egg rolls....spring rolls....would be an okay place to start. (Yep...that is a hint!)

~Kathleen

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