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Old 07-12-2016, 09:56 AM   #11
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This is quite interesting, and as I am working through a Mediterranean cookbook for ideas, I have most of the spices.

You do say evaporation is important, ever tried this in a pressure cooker? Because I am tempted to.

Actually I am going to try this in a pressure cooker as soon as I can get my hands on appropriate meats.

Cheers,

TBS (fox)
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Old 07-12-2016, 10:27 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
Unless you live pretty close to the Arctic Circle and it's mid-summer, when nights are very short, this is not good advice. The USDA recommends refrigerating cooked meat within 2 hours to avoid foodborne illness. Otherwise, throw it out.
Yes, yes, and all that. But give a thought to the origin of the recipe. The dish is designed to survive, unrefrigerated, for several days in a tropical environment. It can handle a night out of the fridge without killing anyone.

But it'll still improve, even if you put it in the fridge, so I won't press the issue.
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:21 PM   #13
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The origin of the recipe is from a time when people did not have refrigeration. They had no choice. Dysentery was pretty common before refrigeration was available and the germ theory was understood.
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:26 PM   #14
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One should never ever leave a dish like that out on the counter overnight.

It cannot handle a night without refrigeration.
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Old 07-12-2016, 01:12 PM   #15
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Ilove Beef Rendang, and I love the recipe you posted, and I'm going to make it with your recipe this winter.

Many thanks

di reston


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Old 07-12-2016, 01:35 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
This is quite interesting, and as I am working through a Mediterranean cookbook for ideas, I have most of the spices.

You do say evaporation is important, ever tried this in a pressure cooker? Because I am tempted to.

Actually I am going to try this in a pressure cooker as soon as I can get my hands on appropriate meats.

Cheers,

TBS (fox)
You could simmer it uncovered after cooking to evaporate the liquid.
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Old 07-12-2016, 03:24 PM   #17
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Or, GotGarlic, I could reserve the liquid, follow me hear, finish off the beef and add a little broth and a shite ton of corn starch to the liquid and make a sauce!
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Old 07-12-2016, 03:44 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
You do say evaporation is important, ever tried this in a pressure cooker? Because I am tempted to.
I understand the impulse: not only would the meat quickly get to the right state of done-ness, but the flavours would also quickly percolate into the meat: exactly what you want.

As far as I can figure, the long, slow aspect of the recipe is mostly for the sauce, so could you make a good rendang by slowly reducing the sauce on its own and then adding to the raw meat? That's exactly what I did for my halibut rendang recipe, and it's one of the best things I've ever made.

Someone mentioned commercial rendang paste. I've never seen it, but if it's anything like commercial Indian curry pastes, it's probably very good. Take a jar of that, some meat, and a pressure cooker, and you might be talking fast-food rendang.
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Old 07-12-2016, 03:53 PM   #19
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Or, GotGarlic, I could reserve the liquid, follow me hear, finish off the beef and add a little broth and a shite ton of corn starch to the liquid and make a sauce!
"Follow me here"? Um, I don't need that kind of condescension for making a suggestion. Knock it off.
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Old 07-12-2016, 07:50 PM   #20
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Interesting. Never heard of it.

Totally of topic. General statement, and it goes to me too, would be nice to have recipe accompanied by pictures.
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Beef Rendang [CENTER][B]Beef Rendang[/B][/CENTER] The meat in rendangs is typically not browned at the beginning. It gets browned at the end, when the rendang turns "dry." Here I brown it first anyway, just out of habit, but feel free to skip that step and shorten the recipe. I've offered some substitutions, but try to find kaffir lime leaves and galangal for best effect. If you can find fresh turmeric, all the better. You can also make this in a slow-cooker, but evaporation is important, so keep the lid ajar. I highly recommend doubling the recipe, as it can keep for a couple of weeks in the fridge, and it freezes just fine. 1 tsp salt 1 tsp ground coriander seed 1/4 tsp ground turmeric 1 inch ginger roughly chopped 4 large cloves garlic roughly chopped 4 large shallots roughly chopped (about 7 ounces) chili pepper flakes to taste (I used about 3 TBS) 2 TBS vegetable oil 2 pounds beef shanks or shortribs cut into large cubes 2 stalks lemongrass white part only, bruised but left whole 4 kaffir lime leaves (important ingredient, but lime zest will do in a pinch) 1 inch galangal sliced into coins (no galangal? use ginger) 1 can coconut milk (taste before using - it can be rancid) 1 TBS light brown sugar (the recipe calls for palm sugar, but it makes no difference here) Add all the salt, coriander, turmeric, ginger, garlic, shallots, and chili flakes to a food processor and turn into a smooth spice paste. Add the oil to a heavy bottomed pot and heat over medium high heat until shimmering. Fry the beef in batches, allowing each surface to brown before turning. Put aside for now. Add the spice paste to the hot oil along with the lemongrass, lime leaves and galangal. Fry until very fragrant and most of the moisture has evaporated (about 4-5 minutes). Add the coconut milk and palm sugar, and then return the beef to the pot, stir to combine then turn the heat down to medium low and loosely cover with a lid (you want some steam to escape). Stir the rendang periodically and simmer for 3-4 hours until the meat is very tender. Once the meat is tender and most of the liquid has evaporated (about 4 hours), remove the lid, ditch the lemongrass, and turn up the heat. You'll need to stir the mixture constantly to prevent it from burning, but you want to evaporate as much liquid as you can without burning the meat. At this point there should be quite a bit of oil in the pot from the meat so you're essentially frying the sauce and concentrating the flavors. The rendang is done when there is almost no sauce left and the meat is dark brown. Ideally you'll let this sit overnight [B]out of the fridge[/B] for the flavors to evenly distribute into the meat. During this time, the meat will turn chocolate and the flavors will deepen. 3 stars 1 reviews
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