"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-13-2016, 01:00 AM   #21
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Totally of topic. General statement, and it goes to me too, would be nice to have recipe accompanied by pictures.
It's not at all off-topic, and photographs here would be really helpful because, once it starts to get really dark, it starts to look like you've got a disaster on your hands, but don't. Here's the Saveur recipe, which is quite similar to my own. They also do a Rendang Ayam (chicken) that is excellent.

But what I was looking for was a Saveur(?) article showing the dish getting darker. I can't find it on Saveur, and Cooks' Illustrated insists I mean "reading" (don't they seem just a little ... parochial these days?).

So, folks, somewhere out there is a great illustrative essay of rendang-making, awaiting discovery.
__________________

__________________
outRIAAge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2016, 01:35 AM   #22
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 185
My brain finally kicked in: The progressive images are from Marc at norecipes.com, and shows exactly what you should expect as the rendang cooks down.

His recipe looks ... gulp ... disturbingly similar to my own, suggesting an outright steal that I then conveniently forgot about: oops :-) Somewhere down in the comments we have a fun conversation, riffin' on rendang. Turns out that's also when I came up with my halibut rendang recipe.

Follow Marc's advice on Kara coconut cream powder. Short of fresh, the only thing better is frozen coconut milk/cream, which I buy by the armload whenever I can. I find that about 10% of cans are either rancid or tasting ... waxy, whereas the powder is reliable.
__________________

__________________
outRIAAge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2016, 02:04 AM   #23
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 517
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
"Follow me here"? Um, I don't need that kind of condescension for making a suggestion. Knock it off.
I was thinking out loud, and I was making a connection with different cooking styles. Is there a problem GotGarlic? If so, please let me know.
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2016, 08:57 AM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 17,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
I was thinking out loud, and I was making a connection with different cooking styles. Is there a problem GotGarlic? If so, please let me know.
No, sorry. I misunderstood.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2016, 10:21 AM   #25
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
No, sorry. I misunderstood.
So happens, "I Misunderstood" is the title of my favourite song from the man who has owned British folk-singing for the last fifty years, Richard Thompson:
She said: "Darling I'm in love with your mind,
The way you care for me is so kind,
I'd love to see you again, wish I had more time."
She was laughing as she brushed my cheek,
"Why don't you call me, Angel, maybe next week?
Promise now, cross your heart, hope to die."

But I misunderstood,
But I misunderstood,
But I misunderstood,
I thought she was saying good luck; she was saying goodbye.


Could we please get back on topic now?
__________________

__________________
outRIAAge is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
beef, recipe

Beef Rendang [CENTER][B]Beef Rendang[/B][/CENTER] The meat in rendangs is typically not browned at the beginning. It gets browned at the end, when the rendang turns "dry." Here I brown it first anyway, just out of habit, but feel free to skip that step and shorten the recipe. I've offered some substitutions, but try to find kaffir lime leaves and galangal for best effect. If you can find fresh turmeric, all the better. You can also make this in a slow-cooker, but evaporation is important, so keep the lid ajar. I highly recommend doubling the recipe, as it can keep for a couple of weeks in the fridge, and it freezes just fine. 1 tsp salt 1 tsp ground coriander seed 1/4 tsp ground turmeric 1 inch ginger roughly chopped 4 large cloves garlic roughly chopped 4 large shallots roughly chopped (about 7 ounces) chili pepper flakes to taste (I used about 3 TBS) 2 TBS vegetable oil 2 pounds beef shanks or shortribs cut into large cubes 2 stalks lemongrass white part only, bruised but left whole 4 kaffir lime leaves (important ingredient, but lime zest will do in a pinch) 1 inch galangal sliced into coins (no galangal? use ginger) 1 can coconut milk (taste before using - it can be rancid) 1 TBS light brown sugar (the recipe calls for palm sugar, but it makes no difference here) Add all the salt, coriander, turmeric, ginger, garlic, shallots, and chili flakes to a food processor and turn into a smooth spice paste. Add the oil to a heavy bottomed pot and heat over medium high heat until shimmering. Fry the beef in batches, allowing each surface to brown before turning. Put aside for now. Add the spice paste to the hot oil along with the lemongrass, lime leaves and galangal. Fry until very fragrant and most of the moisture has evaporated (about 4-5 minutes). Add the coconut milk and palm sugar, and then return the beef to the pot, stir to combine then turn the heat down to medium low and loosely cover with a lid (you want some steam to escape). Stir the rendang periodically and simmer for 3-4 hours until the meat is very tender. Once the meat is tender and most of the liquid has evaporated (about 4 hours), remove the lid, ditch the lemongrass, and turn up the heat. You'll need to stir the mixture constantly to prevent it from burning, but you want to evaporate as much liquid as you can without burning the meat. At this point there should be quite a bit of oil in the pot from the meat so you're essentially frying the sauce and concentrating the flavors. The rendang is done when there is almost no sauce left and the meat is dark brown. Ideally you'll let this sit overnight [B]out of the fridge[/B] for the flavors to evenly distribute into the meat. During this time, the meat will turn chocolate and the flavors will deepen. 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.