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Old 07-11-2016, 05:03 PM   #1
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Beef Rendang

Beef Rendang

The meat in rendangs is typically not browned at the beginning. It gets browned at the end, when the rendang turns "dry." Here I brown it first anyway, just out of habit, but feel free to skip that step and shorten the recipe. I've offered some substitutions, but try to find kaffir lime leaves and galangal for best effect. If you can find fresh turmeric, all the better. You can also make this in a slow-cooker, but evaporation is important, so keep the lid ajar. I highly recommend doubling the recipe, as it can keep for a couple of weeks in the fridge, and it freezes just fine.

1 tsp salt
1 tsp ground coriander seed
1/4 tsp ground turmeric
1 inch ginger roughly chopped
4 large cloves garlic roughly chopped
4 large shallots roughly chopped (about 7 ounces)
chili pepper flakes to taste (I used about 3 TBS)
2 TBS vegetable oil
2 pounds beef shanks or shortribs cut into large cubes
2 stalks lemongrass white part only, bruised but left whole
4 kaffir lime leaves (important ingredient, but lime zest will do in a pinch)
1 inch galangal sliced into coins (no galangal? use ginger)
1 can coconut milk (taste before using - it can be rancid)
1 TBS light brown sugar (the recipe calls for palm sugar, but it makes no difference here)

Add all the salt, coriander, turmeric, ginger, garlic, shallots, and chili flakes to a food processor and turn into a smooth spice paste.

Add the oil to a heavy bottomed pot and heat over medium high heat until shimmering. Fry the beef in batches, allowing each surface to brown before turning. Put aside for now.

Add the spice paste to the hot oil along with the lemongrass, lime leaves and galangal. Fry until very fragrant and most of the moisture has evaporated (about 4-5 minutes). Add the coconut milk and palm sugar, and then return the beef to the pot, stir to combine then turn the heat down to medium low and loosely cover with a lid (you want some steam to escape). Stir the rendang periodically and simmer for 3-4 hours until the meat is very tender.

Once the meat is tender and most of the liquid has evaporated (about 4 hours), remove the lid, ditch the lemongrass, and turn up the heat. You'll need to stir the mixture constantly to prevent it from burning, but you want to evaporate as much liquid as you can without burning the meat. At this point there should be quite a bit of oil in the pot from the meat so you're essentially frying the sauce and concentrating the flavors.

The rendang is done when there is almost no sauce left and the meat is dark brown. Ideally you'll let this sit overnight out of the fridge for the flavors to evenly distribute into the meat. During this time, the meat will turn chocolate and the flavors will deepen.

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Old 07-11-2016, 05:54 PM   #2
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Beef Rendang

This sounds very interesting, and very unique! Thanks for the recipe! I've never heard of beef rendang.
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Old 07-11-2016, 05:57 PM   #3
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Thanks. I noticed your comment on Harry's recipe and the short cooking time. That's because his recipe uses ground pork to make meatballs rather than chunks of beef that needs long simmering.
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Old 07-11-2016, 07:12 PM   #4
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Thanks for the recipe! I love rendang. I've always made it with chicken, but I will have to try your beef recipe.
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Old 07-11-2016, 07:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Thanks. I noticed your comment on Harry's recipe and the short cooking time. That's because his recipe uses ground pork to make meatballs rather than chunks of beef that needs long simmering.
This sauce really needs long, slow reduction, but I can see that Harry's recipe makes for an excellent dish, so that is not meant as criticism.

I also developed a recipe for Halibut Rendang, which I'll put up here once I figure out an alternative to the sous-vide method I use. Fish rendangs are normally completely different from meat ones, because of course you can't cook fish for hours, except that with sous-vide, you now can.
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Old 07-11-2016, 07:34 PM   #6
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A warning on fresh turmeric

If you find fresh turmeric, and have never used it before, PLEASE note that it can stain things that nothing else can stain, like it'll even stain low-grade stainless steel. If it ever gets on your good clothes, you're in trouble.

That said, it runs rings around dried turmeric.
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Old 07-11-2016, 10:05 PM   #7
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That does sound like a really good, flavorful dish....thank you for sharing!
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Old 07-12-2016, 12:14 AM   #8
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Kerisik (Grated, toasted coconut)

Kerisik (Grated, toasted coconut)

I should have posted this when I posted the rendang recipe. This stuff is addictive, and is the standard sprinkly topping for Malaysian curries and rendangs.

Malaysian recipes always say you have to make it just before serving, but those guys don't have refrigerators, and I suspect their recipes are like those thrillingly-optimistic ones of ours that start: "First make the puff pastry..." This recipe makes more than you need for one dish, and it's fine in the fridge for a while. I suspect it would also freeze well.

1 ripe coconut

Grinding or Pounding the Coconut
Depending on your preferred consistency, either place the coconut meat in the food processor and pulse until it resembles very coarse sawdust (about one minute) or pound the coconut by hand in a mortar and pestle. For rendangs, I like to leave the coconut shreds lightly pounded and slightly thick so that their unique juiciness and texture are still recognizable once mixed into the dish. Makes several cups of kerisik.

Toasting the Coconut
Place the grated coconut meat in a bare (not oiled) skillet or wok over medium heat. Toast the coconut slowly, stirring around with a spatula to evenly disperse the heat. Continue to toast until the slivers of coconut are golden brown and toasty-smelling. Some slivers may toast more slowly or quickly than other slivers; don't worry as long as the general distribution is golden brown, with perhaps a few darker and white slivers in the mix. The entire process, set over low heat, should take five to ten minutes.
Transfer the toasted coconut to a bowl and allow to cool. Will keep in the fridge for a couple of weeks, but it IS addictive.
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Old 07-12-2016, 06:54 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by outRIAAge View Post
The rendang is done when there is almost no sauce left and the meat is dark brown. Ideally you'll let this sit overnight out of the fridge for the flavors to evenly distribute into the meat. During this time, the meat will turn chocolate and the flavors will deepen.
Unless you live pretty close to the Arctic Circle and it's mid-summer, when nights are very short, this is not good advice. The USDA recommends refrigerating cooked meat within 2 hours to avoid foodborne illness. Otherwise, throw it out.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/shared/PDF/...ffect_Food.pdf
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Old 07-12-2016, 08:30 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by outRIAAge View Post
The rendang is done when there is almost no sauce left and the meat is dark brown. Ideally you'll let this sit overnight out of the fridge for the flavors to evenly distribute into the meat. During this time, the meat will turn chocolate and the flavors will deepen.

Yikes!

Please, please do NOT do this, folks! It violates every food safety rule known to man!
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Beef Rendang [CENTER][B]Beef Rendang[/B][/CENTER] The meat in rendangs is typically not browned at the beginning. It gets browned at the end, when the rendang turns "dry." Here I brown it first anyway, just out of habit, but feel free to skip that step and shorten the recipe. I've offered some substitutions, but try to find kaffir lime leaves and galangal for best effect. If you can find fresh turmeric, all the better. You can also make this in a slow-cooker, but evaporation is important, so keep the lid ajar. I highly recommend doubling the recipe, as it can keep for a couple of weeks in the fridge, and it freezes just fine. 1 tsp salt 1 tsp ground coriander seed 1/4 tsp ground turmeric 1 inch ginger roughly chopped 4 large cloves garlic roughly chopped 4 large shallots roughly chopped (about 7 ounces) chili pepper flakes to taste (I used about 3 TBS) 2 TBS vegetable oil 2 pounds beef shanks or shortribs cut into large cubes 2 stalks lemongrass white part only, bruised but left whole 4 kaffir lime leaves (important ingredient, but lime zest will do in a pinch) 1 inch galangal sliced into coins (no galangal? use ginger) 1 can coconut milk (taste before using - it can be rancid) 1 TBS light brown sugar (the recipe calls for palm sugar, but it makes no difference here) Add all the salt, coriander, turmeric, ginger, garlic, shallots, and chili flakes to a food processor and turn into a smooth spice paste. Add the oil to a heavy bottomed pot and heat over medium high heat until shimmering. Fry the beef in batches, allowing each surface to brown before turning. Put aside for now. Add the spice paste to the hot oil along with the lemongrass, lime leaves and galangal. Fry until very fragrant and most of the moisture has evaporated (about 4-5 minutes). Add the coconut milk and palm sugar, and then return the beef to the pot, stir to combine then turn the heat down to medium low and loosely cover with a lid (you want some steam to escape). Stir the rendang periodically and simmer for 3-4 hours until the meat is very tender. Once the meat is tender and most of the liquid has evaporated (about 4 hours), remove the lid, ditch the lemongrass, and turn up the heat. You'll need to stir the mixture constantly to prevent it from burning, but you want to evaporate as much liquid as you can without burning the meat. At this point there should be quite a bit of oil in the pot from the meat so you're essentially frying the sauce and concentrating the flavors. The rendang is done when there is almost no sauce left and the meat is dark brown. Ideally you'll let this sit overnight [B]out of the fridge[/B] for the flavors to evenly distribute into the meat. During this time, the meat will turn chocolate and the flavors will deepen. 3 stars 1 reviews
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